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PBS
Sep 12, 2012 4:00pm PDT
" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles. - i love strawberries! and today we're going to the enchanted garden to pick some! and then we're going to learn how crayons are made at the crayon factory! i'm so glad you're coming with us! be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. hood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along -
WETA
Sep 7, 2012 6:00pm EDT
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WETA
Sep 19, 2012 6:00pm EDT
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PBS
Sep 19, 2012 4:00pm PDT
and major corporations. >> this is "bbc world news ing and fromrte washington. >> just a few blocks away, children were singing school songs, classes were going on. this neighborhood is divided. >> french authorities increase security at nearly two dozen embassies after a magazine publishes cartoons of the prophet muhammed. an extreme fault that lands i adventure in serious trouble. thanks to the internet, the search party has something to celebrate. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. rebels said they took control of a border crossing to turkey today, but in damascus opposition forces are in retreat. the situation for civilians is dire and the report has been issued on the love boat accusing the government forces of deliberately attacking bread lines and hospitals. >> back to school in damascus, singing the national anthem saluting the army that keeps them safe. this is not just a song. this central neighborhood is now heavily protected. the world of these children is not just for of all around winnie the pooh. are you happy to be back as school, the teacher asks. yes, they respond. are you afraid of anything, she asks. no. do you feel safe at home, there is allowed -- the loud of a shell. what about the loud sound? oh, he says it is far away. actually, this is not that far. this is a government-supported the neighborhood. just a few blocks away, clashes are going on. this neighborhood is divided. just like syria. >> it is harder to move around now, there are so many checkpoints. the soldiers seemed relaxed today, even walk to me. -- even welcoming. this is as far as they will let us go. even driving around this neighborhood with our government minder, the destruction is visible. houses were reduced to rubble during the weeks of the soul to put down the opposition. the damages were assessed inside. they were too afraid to speak on camera. -- the damages were worse inside. damascus is a city divided. all day today there has been government shelling in some areas, fighting in others. many schools have not even opened. here, inside these walls, the still chant slogans of the ruling party. >> for more on the old order's fight for survival, i am joined by a senior fellow for the middle east institute. you give us a sense of what people might think might push aside out of power. >> the main thing, giving the external intervention is not going to happen, this is greater weapons for the opposition. this is being debated across the west. this is turning into a proxy battle that i think no one knows with the outcome will be. >> what about turkey itself? if people at the white house are looking at turkey as a country that might take the lead, whether it is in creating safe havens, no-fly zones. >> turkey says that the u.s. is holding them back from exploring those options. there is a lot of double talk going on that is hard to understand. we will have to wait and see what the response of the white house's. everyone is trying to decide whether the policy will change or not. >> as some point governments will say this crisis has gone on for so long, so many people have been killed, that our policy of not intervening is under pressure. >> exactly, when you have 200 people a day killed it, very little intervention, a lack of basic human decency. . they do not understand why the assistance is not coming. this does not bode well for syria. >> the arguments for not intervening is because there's no coherent opposition. in your conversations comment did you get the sense that that is changing? >> yes, there is more structured to be rebel army. there are more military councils. there is more structure but not the kind of regular force. iran hasrrived and they are supporting the creation of a regular forces for the regime. they have no problem with backing a regular forces but the west does. that will be an issue, how does this affect the allies response? >> is anything in your conversations with people in washington that after november 6th, the might be a policy of intervention? >> i don't think that obama would like to lead on this. let others try to step up to lead, they want to put restrictions into place and that frustrates allies. especially turkey, saudi arabia, qatar as well. >> thank you for coming. france says it will temporarily close its indices and schools and in 20 countries after a french magazine published satirical pictures of the prophet mohammad. the last time it published similar cartoons, the french offices of the magazine were firebombed. >> the right police were at the offices this morning. not the only precaution the french authorities were taking. the cartoon satirize the muslim reaction to an american movie. the next pri will be friday, the moslem day of prayer. -- the next printing will be friday. when we attacked the catholic hard right, nobody talked about it. but we're not allowed to make fun of muslim hotliners. it is the new rule, but we will not obey it. >> they printed a similar series of cartoons earlier and there offices were firebombed. its style is widely recognized. it is often crude, cruel, consistently provocative. this would be considered offensive even by non muslims. the timing has been condemned. the white house questioned the judgment of the editor. in the past week, there been violent demonstrations outside of american embassies. in libya, the ambassador was killed. in 20 countries, they have stepped up security. in cairo, the embassy was surrounded by police. schools have been protected. want these people to think that we're infringing their right to free expression. the government has urged the muslim community to register their anger to the courts. one group has registered a complaint. the head of the muslim council called for calm. >> we expressed to him the fury at these provocations but we talk about our peaceful intentions. >> france has the biggest muslim community in europe. the tensions are high. after protests last week, the government has refused a request for a bigger demonstration on saturday. the foreign minister says it is about france's problem. >> tensions have not eased across the middle east a week after the american ambassador to libya was killed in benghazi. and all to conservative muslim group denied any involvement in the assault but said it rejected what it's all as the imposition of democracy in libya. -- what it saw as the imposition of democracy in libya. >> libya celebrating martyrs' day with guns. there are reminders everywhere of the sacrifices these people made to win their freedom. there are some here who refused to lay down their weapons. radical islamist groups say the fight for the villa is not over. they completely reject a western-style solution. >> we don't believe in the democratic system, even those countries pretend the are ruled by democracy, they know it is a mistake. we want to tell the whole world that the project of democracy is not for us and it does not suit islam. >> one group denies that they were responsible for the death of the american ambassador. they support the rights of muslims to protest against blasphemy. about 50 people were arrested in connection. it will not say who they are what the evidence is. a day confess that many of the perpetrators might have already left libya. for much of this is just for show and the new authorities have been criticized for failing to get on top of a worsening security situation. stand against these groups and we will be successful. we believe the majority is against this. >> all of this instability has a crippling impact of benghazi's ambition to rebuild. this town was abandoned last year by its chinese developers. they and other foreign investors have yet to return. most libyans support their democratic projects and this city has a largely positive feel. a handful of radical militants to still spoil everything. >> of the complications of post-gaddafi of libya. the president of georgia has said the country's entire prison staff will be suspended after a video merged showing inmates being severely abused. prisoners are shown being badly beaten, one is sexually assaulted. relatives of the inmates attempted to storm the facilities where the abuse allegedly happened. an inquiry in the u.s. has uncovered serious management failures in a sting operation that would let gunrunners smuggle weapons to mexico. agents in the operation known as operation fast and furious lost the weapons. the attorney general was cleared of any wrongdoing. there was a record summer melting. satellite images show the icecap melted back of the timber the 16th, the minimum for the year and the smallest extent on record. the tension between japan and china over a chain of disputed islands in the east china sea has erupted into a diplomatic fight. the presumed next leader of china has warned japan to rein in their behavior. he made the comments during a meeting with leon panetta. he told the bbc it would be important for the countries to resolve the dispute. >> uninhabited and isolated, they could spark war in asia. offer there is some oil and gas at here, but it is national pride at stake. already, ships are fighting at sea, japan and china duelling. chinese nationalists tried to plant their fight last month. japan says that they have bought the islands. they have urged restraint. there has been a fury in china, people here are taught to remember the japanese wartime atrocities and encouraged to believe that type of's power is rising. this is a combustible mix. -- they are occurs to to believe that japan's power is rising. there is aggressive nationalism in china and also attention with its neighbors. that means with a small incident, it could set off a dangerous dynamic. it could even soft in america which has a defense treaty obliging it to help japan in any conflict. >> these kinds of incidents could drag the u.s. into it in one capacity or another. it cannot be allowed to become the kind of dynamite or explosive territorial disputes that could result in a larger conflict. >> for leon panetta, he has been here urging cool heads. the problem is that nobody would like to look weak. certainly not the man expected to take over as the next chinese leader. he cannot afford to be soft on japan. china has put an end to the street protests, but they have dispatched more boats to the island. exactly the sort of move that gives american military leaders sleepless nights. >> watching the south china seas very carefully. you are watching "bbc world news america," killing super weeds. we tell you how farmers are trying to save their crops from ever-stronger weeds. aung san suu kyi who is visiting the u.s. has been presented with the country's highest civilian honor, four years after she was awarded it a while under house arrest. she described it as one of the most movie does for life. >> committed the patriotic splendor of the u.s. capitol, something all too rare in washington, unity and joy. aung san suu kyi collected them medal awarded four years ago when george bush was president and she was under house arrest. >> i thank you, the people of america, and you, the representatives, for keeping us in your hearts and minds during the dark years when freedom and justice seemed beyond our reach. >> the ceremony was had been turned down after respect for the reformist government in burma to which aung san suu kyi paid a generous to beat. her american host new they were in the president of an icon. >> when her isolated had ended, we met her in person. we found not a symbol, but a woman. a woman of tremendous you are, honesty, grace. >> it is almost too delicious to believe, my friend, that you are here in the rotunda of our great capital, the centerpiece of our democracy, as an elected member of your apartment. >> they looked a emotional, she a little bit overwhelmed by comparisons to gandhi, king, mandela >> for every action there is a reaction and it is true in the world pharmaceuticals as well. an increase in genetically- modified crops in the u.s. has led to a rise in so-called super weeds. these plants are resistant to many herbicide which forces farmers to use up to 20 times the recommended dose of weed killer. >> the rise of resisted weeds on this farm near humboldt, nebraska has threatened the livelihood and family. last year, he spent $7.5000 on chemical sprays that failed to protect his crops. the pungent palling from these weeds seriously affected his 8- year-old daughter's asthma. >> it makes her hard for her to brief. -- breathe. >> one of the problems is giant ragweed. you can see these plants tower over my head. scientists have been tried to kill these weeds using extra doses of chemical spray. they were able to survive 24 times the dose. its scientists cannot kill them with chemicals, it would take over this entire corn field. the resistance has been caused by the huge success of gm in the u.s. which has encouraged farmers to only use one chemical. now, they believe the solution lies in adding another herbicide that until now was to destructive to crops. >> this time, it shows the gradual killing of the week after spraying with the weed killer. >> this is best known for being part of the mix that constituted agent orange. some scientists believe it offers farmers a new method in the fight against weeds. it should not be seen as a silver bullet. >> essentially, we will develop resistance. >> as a result, some researchers are developing a way of beating the creeping inventors pushed to. >> they're looking for ways to suppress the weeds naturally. the future might depend on them. >> he is an extreme sports in doocy as with a taste for danger. the british in the venture got more than he bargained for when he had to be rescued from a freeze engorged days after crashing while speed fine. his friends raised more than $22,000 and he was found with little more than a broken ankle. >> he was pictured after being rescued in the swiss alps. he had been trapped for almost 70 hours. he was taking part in an extreme sport. this shows what it can involve. he was fine with two friends from a launch site but he did not reach the agreed landing site forced to come down near the bottom of a waterfall. the search teams were sent to find him. >> we're thankful to everyone. without the contribution, we would not have found him. >> it has been anxious at his place of work. the staff and customers have been waiting for news. holly has known and worked for him for three years. she is relief that he has been found safe and well. >> we care about him a lot. it is ok now, because he is fine. he was essentially found after making a sign from branches. it is not thought that he suffered any serious injuries and he is in good spirits and grateful for the support he received. >> but will he be speed find again? that brings the show to a close. you can get more on that story and any other news on our website. thank you so much for watching. i will see you back here tomorrow. >> makes sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding of this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operation. working to nurture new ventures and how to provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you. >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. - hi, neighbour! today it's my birthday, and we're going to have a birthday party! and then we're going to the park for a picnic! d you're coming too! and i'll be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in th
PBS
Sep 14, 2012 4:00pm PDT
>> this is "bbc world news america." waves of anger over an anti- american film. oh, no, you don't. the duke and duchess of cambridge outraged by a french magazine publishing pictures of kate. and one family finds out whether it is a balloon or a bust. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. today, the anger over a controversial film mocking is long has spread even further. in another arab nation, protesters took to the streets and there have been violent outburst from india and indonesia. one person was killed during protests in 11 on -- lebanon. there are concerns that extremists hostile to the west may be exploiting the situation. our middle east editor jeremy bowen reports. >> protests have started here in cairo and tuesday night -- on tuesday night, and it is still going on. it has spread throughout the middle east and beyond. the police fired tear gas to keep protesters away from the u.s. embassy. it is the target because the anti-muslim foam they hate so much was produced in america. the anger about the film is still a driving force. in cairo, other grievances have been grafted onto its. this is about a lot more now than the film and america. it is more about the fractures in society. since the revolution, those have been getting wider. in khartoum, protesters broke into the u.s. embassy in the german embassy. the film appalls plenty of people. but what is happening is tapping into assumptions that the west is against them. later they attacked the british embassy and moved on to the u.s. compound. in tunis, at least two demonstrators were killed as the u.s. embassy was stormed. later, the american center was burned down. in tunisia, salafists are agitating against more moderate political islamists who won the majority in the election. the city is a stronghold of sunni political islamist. and the protests have spread beyond the arab countries to bangladesh. 1 fell on the internet is deepening anti-western feeling -- one film on the internet is deepening anti-western feeling in a wide swath of the world. in the united states, the body of the dead u.s. ambassador and his three colleagues that were killed in the attack or brought home. it was a part of the world in which it once had real political power. -- they once had real political power. >> and just a brief time ago, i spoke to jeremy in cairo. i asked what the sentiment was like. >> there is a lot of anger. in egypt, it has become more complicated because a lot of local issues have been grafted onto the initial anger about the film. now, i think what is significant today is that it has spread to other countries, and i think the more other countries, and because today is the muslim day of prayer, perhaps it might be the combination, but there have been people killed. and there are real, genuine grievances behind all of this. >> jeremy bowen in tahrir square for us there. i spoke with robin wright. thank you for coming in. has the tyranny of the dictator in the middle east been replaced by the tyranny of the mob? >> that is the great danger, and the fact that this has moved into three days has become increasingly worrisome. whether this is like what we saw in 1979 with the takeover of the u.s. embassy, which dragged on for 144 days. these models are not very small. the first demonstration in egypt was very large. this is in stark contrast to the hundreds of thousands of people who turned out against of the mubarak. it seems more of these are unemployed, young, of kinds of bugs -- thugs, the disenfranchised at the moment. this is an awful transition. the pain we have seen over the last three days underscores that. >> and yet people say it how can the ambassador to libya be killed when it america helped overthrow colonel gaddafi? >> in many ways, this is the most tragic country. the u.s. and nato went in and used military muscle to do what the libyan troops on the ground could not do, and that was to take away the strategic assets of gaddafi. to return as ambassador -- he worked on the ground in libya. he of all people would have been surprised by what happened. >> the german embassy was attacked. they had absolutely nothing to do with the islamic film which was made in the u.s. do you think this is more of a generalized anti-western sentiment? >> is the debate of more than 30 years now. is it the west and islam incompatible? i do not think so, but there are those who will look for not just american targets, but any western shuttle endeavour. >> just briefly, do you see these protests continuing or fizzling out after friday prayers? >> i expect they will continue in some form in some places. >> thank you for joining us with that analysis and what is going on in the arab world right now. in other news, striking south african workers have rejected a fresh offer from management to end the week-long industrial dispute. the miners made their decision at a rally near the mine. meanwhile, the government will not tolerate what it calls " illegal gatherings. -- illegal gatherings." david settle stands accused of breaking the law because the play "the river and the mountain" was performed without permission. the trial of a man begins in london. he denies charges of fraud -- fraud and false accounting. the jury was told ubs management knew what he was doing. tens of thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes in guatemala because of a major volcano eruptions. burning rocks have been thrown 1,000 meters into the air from the crater. totally unjustifiable -- that is the reaction from the british royal family today after a magazine published in topless photos of the duchess of cambridge. the pictures were taken while the duke and duchess were on holiday at a private chateau. now the couple, who are continuing their tour of the far east, say they are going to sue. we have this report. >> it was a day to be demure. friday, the muslim holy day. william and cates making their first visit to a mosque. covered.ad was they both removed their shoes. at that stage, they had heard about, but had not seen the photographs. they said they were saddened by the incident. after they left the mosque, officials received copies of what had been published. and the reaction changed. instead of sadness, there was. . officials started talking about are red and line being crossed. william through his spokesman took issue in an official statement. he said the photographs invaded their privacy in an and justifiable manner and its invoked the memory of his mother. the incident is reminiscent of the worst excesses of the proper r.o.t.c. against -- pop rock scene -- papparazzi against princess diana. unknown to the couple, photographers were staking the place out. the photographs were published on of french and gossip magazine. the magazine's editor appeared not to understand what the fuss was about. >> one should not dramatize these pictures. the reactions are little disproportionate. what we saw in the pictures was a young couple, just married, in love, who are beautiful. >> and the relationship diana, princess of wales, had with the press was a complicated one. she was constantly haunted, and the same thing must not be allowed to happen to kate. >> it is impossible to relax and have downtime if you always have in the back of your mind "perhaps there is a camera there ever is these people are human. yes, they are the royal family. but they should be allowed to have complete privacy when they are not doing their duty. >> everywhere they go on a tour such as this, william and kate are surrounded by cameras. that is something they know they have to accept. as they left a club or -- as they left for their next destination, william remembers only to it to the what happened to his mother. he in particular seems to regard this as a watershed. after a day of real anger here and conversations with lawyers in paris, the confirmation that the duke and duchess of cambridge are to take action and sue the french magazine for a breach of their privacy in the french courts. >> for more on the controversial publication of these photos, i whoke with the royal expert joined us from new york. this is only the second time in history the royal family has sued the press. what do you think is behind this? >> the royals do not actually follow through and sue. they threaten to, but often they do not because it brings more publicity to the person they are upset with. however, i think the actions today speak volumes. william has been very clear this type up photography simply will not be tolerated. he was very clear he will protect kate. he saw firsthand what overzealous photographer craig did to his mother and history -- overzealous photography did to his mother, and he is determined that history will not repeat itself. >> talking about his mother, do you think william is determined to make sure she is protected? >> absolutely. we saw kate smiling and getting on with the job at hand. you could see this was very much on william's mines. we have seen a play out with his attitude toward her family. he has been protected of all of them. the british press learned early on not to cross that line. unfortunately it is a lesson the foreign press still needs to learn. >> remember those pictures of prince harry in las vegas recently. can they really control what is published? >> that is where it gets tricky, when you're talking about the world. you really cannot control the. recently, an australian magazine published a honeymoon pictures of the couple that we thought did not exist. this sort of action will deter other publications from buying these photographs. "closer" magazine was probably hoping to cash in by selling them around the world. of using this reaction, i think other magazines will think twice before -- after seeing this reaction, i think other magazines will think twice before buying these pictures. >> what lesson do you think kate will have learned the? >> it was a very harsh lesson. it was perhaps not need to think they were totally alone. they are thought to have flown on a commercial aircraft. there is an expectation of privacy. perhaps there was a false sense of security and staying at a family members chateau, but i do not think she will be going topless again. >> thank you for your expert analysis. you're watching "bbc world news america." still to come -- caught in the crackdown. for russians to protest, the price is high. the japanese coastguard says all chinese ships of moved out of the waters in the east china sea. japan demanded six chinese surveillance vessels leave what it claims is japanese territory around the islands. our correspondent has the latest. >> never before has china since cent -- >> said such a large flotilla of ships in the protected territory. these pictures show the six ships steaming toward the rocky outcrop. they are closely shadowed by several japanese coastguard vessels. japanese television later released these pictures from on board one of the ship's. it can be heard, the call for the japanese ships to leave what he called chinese waters. this appears to taken the japanese government by surprise. >> it is extremely regrettable that china is behaving in this way and we strongly advise china to withdraw from the area. >> in china, there were fresh protests in the embassy in beijing. "japanese cowards, get out of china," they shout. the islands are merely a focus for chinese bitterness toward japan and the atrocities it committed in china during the second euribor. but while the chinese and japanese governments are talking tough, the reality is the economies of these two agent -- asian giants are ever more closely aligned. neither beijing nor tokyo wants to see a conflict over the island as the late. bbc news. >> and russia cannot one of president putin's most aggressive political opponents has been expelled from parliament. this is being called an example of a clampdown from authorities. our moscow correspondent, daniel sanford, has more. ♪ it gets ♪ >> and i'm sorry, we had a problem with the transmission. now go to a mystery in the art world. discovering a new painting by one of the world's most renowned artists is something drum of, but it happens rarely. it establishes the authenticity of pictures in a way not thought of before. our correspondent has the results. >> the new dancer -- the blue dancer, a painting by one of the great impressionist masters, edgar degas. wast wasn't until -- it until a degas expert decided it was not by him. what did he not like about the painting? >> there were a few things. the position. i think he said it was not a formal pose. added the draftsmanship of the heads. >> paintings like those are among the most saw after, and fakes are common and lucrative. after lengthy investigation, it is possible to trace "the blue studio. back to degas's but today is painting could be a copy of the original work. so it is tested for the pigments used. >> you are going to the bonds -- bonnet? >> if there is titanium white, death, ly after degas's it would mean that it could not be by ken. >> it is encouraging. ere is lead. >> and one of the criticisms that the position of the dancer does not look right? a ballerina tries to recreate the pose. >> she is looking down, facing forward. that is exactly it, i think. that's it, is in that? >> new evidence was enough to persuade the world's todegas authority the painting is genuine. >> brister cell. - the world's foremost degas authority the painting is genuine. >> brace yourself. "this painting is an authentic degas." >> i never thought this possible. >> is a painting -- is a painting rediscover from the pressure of one of the finest impressionist masters. >> a real degas. now we will try to bring you that story we tried to bring you earlier about what happened to those russian protesters who dared defy the government. >> moscow's summer holiday season is over. politics have returned and the kremlin is reinforcing its control. russia is seeing the biggest political clampdown for 30 years. angry and on the verge of tears, was stripped of his seat as police investigates his business interests. do you think you're being punished? >> of course. your identity, your own is. >> his real crime seems to be taking part of the biggest protest in 30 years. that is why, he says, he has been targeted. >> i think the order comes from the kremlin. in fact, i know it does. know the question is whether the country -- now the question is whether the country can stop this slipping back into the 1930's. >> the clampdown is affecting ordinary citizens, too. seen here in january with his girlfriend alexandra. in may, he was one of the thousands it to the streets to protest couldn't -- vladimir putin's return to the presidency. he was accused of attacking a policeman on be thinnest evidence. >> everyone can see they are not criminals. these are people like you and me. people like a salesman and managers. >> but despite the mounting evidence, president could send insists the opposition is not been specifically targeted by police. >> as we see it, it is only the simple rule that everyone, including the opposition, must comply with russian law and this law will be consistently enforced. >> there was a time when vladimir putin aspired to be a unifying president, a leader of all russians. increasingly, he seems prepared to turn on his own citizens to suppress the growing mood of the sense. bbc news, moscow. >> the face of protesters in today's russia. that brings today's share to close. you can find constant updates on our website and you can see whatever we're working on it any time on our facebook page. for all of us, thank you for watching, have a good weekend, and look forward to seeing you next week. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. - hi, neighbour! today we're going to visit my school for the very first time! and then we're going to my doctor's office to see dr. anna. will you come with me? ok, let's go! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. n the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood! ♪ - hi neighbour! come on in! today i'm going to visit my new school. do you go to school? i'm going to see what my new school will be like. will you come with me? i'm feeling a little nervous.
PBS
Sep 17, 2012 4:00pm PDT
what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america. there -- we are on the ground with government forces and a steady air strike. >> it is a nerve shredding experience. >> tensions heat up between china and japan. a divide over a small group of an uninhabited islands can have a big impact on business. we will take to the edge of the arctic circle. one team is preparing for the call this journey on earth. we did the coldest journey on earth. -- one team is preparing for the coldest journey on earth. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. the syrian conflict, both sides stand accused of a sharp increase in human rights abuses. the united nations said the number of violations by the assad regime is so great that is impossible to investigate every case. at the same time, the organization human rights watch has accused torture and carrying out summary executions. dred scott has traveled to aleppo or the sustained fighting has lasted almost three months. >> it cannot afford to lose syria's biggest city. this goes on all day. there is another bomb. in those parts of the city held by the rebels, a jets can then spits fire. the planes returned to straight again and again, dropping their bombs. the pilots make slow and leisurely turns. they note of the rebels have almost nothing, no ground to air missiles to shoot them down. that is the plane making a low pass over us. we have had many weeks of this here now. civil war best describes what is happening in syria. an air strike a ground this -- an air strike on this neighborhood a few minutes ago. a woman flees barefoot from her home. how many dead, she asks. bashar, you pig, yeah enemy of god, he shouts. these were civilians. there were no emergency services to speak up. neighbors come out to do what they can. then, some good news. real-world are pulled alive from the wreckage of the building. it is incredible -- three little girls are pulled alive from the wreckage of the building. it is incredible they survived. at 3-year-old boy was buried inside. two girls were playing in the street. god is great rises from the crowd. then they run. another plane is coming. rama is one of the girls we saw rescue. three family members and two friends were killed in the attack. her father is still too afraid of the regime to show his face, but he criticizes the rebels, too. that put an anti-aircraft gun on the next building, he tells us. i ask the commander to move it, he tells me. the bomb seems to have gone through the building with a gun in place, then exploded in the family's house across the road. a neighbor says that is what happened. they also accused the regime of bombing recklessly, or of deliberately killing civilians. the rebels said they have no choice but to fight. why is the whole world watching and doing nothing, he says. the dead are lying in the streets. we very people in gardens. why is the world protecting bashar? the turmoil elsewhere in the middle east makes intervention here less likely still. on the front lines, the struggle always seems uneven. but they inch forward against the destructive power of artillery and jets. for the time being, at least, syria's rebels know that here on the ground, they are on their own. >> for more on the unfolding events on the ground in syria, i spoke with our chief international correspondent just a brief time ago. he has gained rare access in damascus. >> you have described damascus as a bubble, insulated from the wider civil war. >> that bubble has been absolutely shattered. the first thing we saw going into damascus today on a sunny day was a huge plume of black smoke rising from one of the neighborhoods, where there is now shelling night and day. we also heard for the first time as night fell, helicopter gunships taking to the skies. there are many more check posts coming into the city and across the city. there are a few places where traffic is brisk, the shops are crowded, and the streets are open. some are going on about their day as if life was normal, but life is not normal here. as one friend said, we are smiling, but inside, we are burning. >> the fine that the many efforts to resolve this conflict or making any headway at all? >> every single person i have met today, whether it is a syrian intelligence person, someone manning a checkpoint, young people in the street, government officials asking, what do you think is the mission? do you think he can succeed where kofi annan did not? they sort of raise their eyes and put their tongue and say at least four government supporters, it depends on the opposition support, that is countries like qatar and saudi arabia. you talk to the opposition, because this is a city that is deeply divided, they will say it is the government's fault, it is on them to stop the violence, otherwise this will continue to unravel in all the very bitter and bloody ways we are seeing across the country. city by city, neighborhood by neighborhood. they say we are not just defending our territory, we are fighting back. >> anger over american made video that mocks the profit mohammed has again inflamed the muslim world. a rare appearance in beirut. he said the u.s. must understand there would be dangerous consequences if the complete film is broadcast. in kabul, 1000 afghans held violent protests, burning cars and tires and shooting at police. in indonesia, hundreds of protesters threw bombs and rocks outside the american embassy in jakarta. with tensions flaring, foreign policies are suddenly being brought to the forefront of the u.s. presidential campaign. for more on international and domestic concerns, i spoke a brief time ago with washington post associate editor bob woodward, author of the new book "the price of politics." following this controversial film about islam, known the president has to do, what is going through his mind as he weighs the response of the administration? >> what can be done about it that is effective? you try to contain them, you try to mollify them as much as you can, but there is not a whole lot, quite frankly. >> in your book, you reflect on the white house's obsession with the campaign and when -- winning the messaging more. how do you see this latest event playing into the presidential campaign? >> we just cannot tell. it may go on for some time, or it may subside, but what they are doing in the white house is saying what is the second and third downs of this? is it going to go into october, the early part of november before the election and had some resonance? i think because they know they cannot control it, they are crossing their fingers. it is the sort of irrational, angry behavior that obama detests more than anything. >> in your book, you are right in a very disspiriting way about the high wire negotiations over the debt ceiling last summer. if the price of politics this function? >> there is a lot of this function in all of this, but what has happened this, the united states has 16 trillion dollars in outstanding ious in the world, and we are spending a trillion dollars more each year than we have. so we have to go into the debt market regularly, and it puts everything in jeopardy, in peril. the treasury secretary, tim geithner, here in the u.s., is running around hollering fire. we've got to do something about this. the simple fact is that the politicians have not been willing to come up with a plan that would involve paying for republicans and democrats, something that is a compromise. so we head into this election with the financial house that is not in order. >> you are very clear in this book that this president, unlike previous presidents, has not worked his will. what are the consequences of that? >> they may be very substantial. president reagan in and president clinton, you can criticize them, and a lot of people would, but they had a way of carrying things over the finish line and getting their way. obama is still distant, somewhat removed from this. he has not engaged on a personal level enough with people, so you see obama reacting intellectually, sometimes with passion, but never to the point, my god, we've got to solve this problem. when i interviewed him for the book at length, he pointed the finger right at the opposition party, the republicans. >> bob woodward, thank you very much indeed for joining us. what started as a dispute over a small group of uninhabited islands in the east china sea has escalated into a standoff between china and japan. the two countries both claim the territory as their own, and now violent demonstrations have led some of the biggest global brands to shut down the chinese operations. >> anti-japanese protests across china showed no signs of abating. in the southern city, thousands of demonstrators surround the japanese consulate. there anger was in full public display. these are being filled by an escalating territorial dispute between the two countries over islands in the east china sea. demonstrators have been targeting japanese businesses operating in china. we are a few hundred meters away from the japanese embassy and they say -- and this area -- many of the businesses here are taking protective measures. they are applying the chinese flag in order to stop attacks by angry demonstrators. the flare-up and tensions between china and japan comes as the u.s. secretary of defense visits the region. in japan, leon panetta warned against an escalation of tensions. >> we are concerned by the conflict that is taking place over the islands. the message i have tried to convey is the message that we have to urge calm and restraint on all sides. >> the also announced an agreement to place a second missile defense radar system in japan. the u.s. says it is designed to contain the north korean missile threat, but beijing may not see it like that. china has sent six surveillance ships to the disputed islands. for now, neither beijing are tokyo appears willing to back down. the worry is a miscalculation by either country could further raised tensions. >> one more note regarding china. president obama filed a complaint against beijing and the world trade organization over what the u.s. says are illegal subsidies. he made that announcement at a campaign speech in ohio after mitt romney accused him of being too soft and china's economic policy. china hit back by launching its own back, challenging u.s. duties on billions of dollars of chinese goods. still to come on tonight's program, the right royal battle in court. lawyers for the duke and duchess of cambridge want the french authorities to stop their magazine publishing intimate photos of kate. spain's two biggest cities have had disruptions of transport services. subway workers went on strike in madrid and barcelona. hundreds of city services were canceled. welcome thisnoisy morning in madrid. the police faced up to rail workers and protested against possible plans to privatize spain's rail network. elsewhere, things went quiet. some services were canceled as those working on the railways went on strike. >> it is complicated. >> i think the strike is there. they want to privatize the rail sector, and i don't think that is right. >> spain has one of the best high-speed rail networks in the world. the unions fear the government plans to -- they believe it would mean job losses and rising fares. over the weekend, thousands of public-sector workers and others demonstrated against the spanish government's austerity reform. the unions warned of more protests. but the government here in madrid shows no signs it is ready to change its agenda of the austerity. in fact, towards the end of this month, the economy minister will announce yet more economic reforms and they could include plans to privatize the railways. privatizing the railways would be a crime for some, but for the government it would provide vital revenue as it tries to balance its budget, a task that is made tougher as the economy is in recession. >> the did conductors of cambridge have begun legal action in paris, trying to halt -- the duke and duchess of cambridge trying to halt pictures showing at the dutchess topless that appeared in a magazine. our correspondent reports. >> a pauper r.o.t.c. scrap in the courthouse of the french lawyer, arriving. he asked the three presiding magistrate to put themselves in the position of the duchess. the magazine had shared without her consent a private moment of intimacy. the balcony in which the royal couple were relaxing could not be seen with the naked eye. could only be seen with a long telephoto lens. the lawyer acting for the magazine claims there was nothing shocking about the photos. it is an ordinary holiday scene. before the hearing began, papers were filed with the public prosecutor relating to a separate criminal complaint that will take longer to resolve. the trouble is, within the criminal complaint, there is as yet no name. the royals don't know the name of the photographer who intruded on their privacy. in france, the protection of sources is taken very seriously. far away from the court room, the royal couple were concentrating on their continuing tour of the solomon islands. the duke and duchess were each presented with a gift by a group of topless ceremonial dancers, perhaps an awkward moment. the couple hopes it will serve as a warning, and tonight there were repercussions for the editor of the daily star in ireland, who has been suspended. in italy, in spite of williams' request for restraint, the controversial fios have been reprinted again, this time in a gossip magazine, at over 26 pages. in espartero -- it has sparked a row. the answer is simple, it is a journalistic scoop, an important scoop. why publish them? we are talking about the future rulers of the united kingdom. this is of interest to our readers. inevitably, the publication of these photos will evoke memories of the treatment encountered by williams late mother diana, princess of wales. the truck -- a couple will discover tomorrow whether they have been successful with their injunction. any redress they do find in france will probably be of limited, symbolic value. >> now for an adventure which must surely be the coldest journey on earth. he has already been to both polls, across the antarctic, and climbed mount everest. what could be left on his list? he is going to cross antarctica in the southern winter. matthew price took on this decidedly brigid assignment. >> they strode, man and machine, for the deep freeze of the arctic night. their breath turn to ice crystals almost as soon as that left their lungs. fingers numb, toes hardened by the extreme cold, this is exploration at the limits of human endurance. >> this is the way i make my living. this is what i do. you could die out there. >> yes, but more people die on the motorway. >> there is ice on my eyelashes, and yet they will have to cope with temperatures as low as -70 in a car to get today. for up to four months of this track, it will be pitch black. if they finally get across the continent, it will be an astonishing achievement. no one has ever crossed the antarctic but in winter before, so for months, two bulldozers will drag three industrial sleds. a science lab, living quarters, their supplies and fuel. but there are problems, even here. the almost lost one of the bulldozers. the crosses in the antarctic ice sheet could prove fatal. this is precisely why they do days of testing here. the bulldozer there is pretty firmly wedged in. is stuck at the moment. they could be in big trouble. what is the effect of -70 on the human body? placese all been warm and one of the things that happens as you begin to get cold, very quickly your body says we will shut off the blood supply of your hands and feet. they are not getting more from the body. freezing of your hands and feet is a real problem. >> night falls, and with it the temperature. but if any of this is to succeed, it is sir reynolds who must make a cross on foot. >> you just must not think about getting old. if you still are lucky enough to be able to walk around, the modest well go for it. >> so the pensioner will push himself to the limit again. matthew price, bbc news, northern sweden, on the edge of the arctic circle. >> the final, freezing frontier. that brings today showed to close. you can find constant updates on our website. to see what we are working on at any time, simply vit our facebook page. for all of us here at bbc world news america, thank you for watching. we'll see you back here tomorrow. >> makes sense of international news at bbc.com. >> funding of this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the business in burma and you work again. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. - hi, neighbour! we have a potty at school. and today prince wednesday's going to use it. did you know there are potties everywhere? even at music man stan's music shop. i'll be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. and contributions in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ (trolley dings.) - thanks, trolley! hi, neighbour! it's me, daniel tiger. today i'm going to school!
WETA
Sep 11, 2012 6:00pm EDT
offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbas wws was presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Sep 4, 2012 5:30pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america. a charm offensive is under way. the first lady gets ready to help with the obama bid. and henry clinton is in china. china warns to stay out of its business. and an accusation of an archaeological cover-up at the place where julius caesar won an epic battle. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. with nine weeks left until the election, every week is a crucial one for the u.s. campaign. tonight, the democratic party -- party begins a charm offensive. mark marquel begins our coverage from charlotte, north carolina. ♪ the democrats are partying at their convention opened, but not too hard. a lot of voters feel let down by the economy and let down by the -- by obama. others are arguing it would be far worse without him, telling audiences in swing states that it would have been a disaster. >> and my opponent had the chance to offer his secret sauce. he did not offer a single new idea. it was just the retread of the same old pots -- policy that has been sticking it to the middle class for years. >> in charlotte, they are determined to sign up every last roeder. polls have every indication that obama will win, but it is pretty much neck-and-neck. even some democrats feel the president has not lived up to their expectations. obama -- >> obama may have done right or not, but if we go republican, we will go back four years and not roger that is any -- where anyone wants to go. >> i'm not sure obama has been with to communicate clearly to the american people what his plan is about. >> this will be tricky for the democrats, hope and change has been replaced by a strategy -- something grubby to something glorias, and rise above petty party bickering. there is a hope among democrats that when the president speaks, you will find new words to inspire. >> the magic was in doing something we had not done before. it is like star trek, go where no man or woman has ever gone before. now it is not trying to do magic. it is trying to do the work. the first lady -- >> the first lady, michelle obama has been practicing her speech tonight. she is now far more popular than hurrahs been. but she has to spell out why he should stay in the white house. >> for more from the democratic benjamin, let's go to our correspondent, steve kingston and charlotte. polls suggest this election is very close, indeed. what do the democrats have to do this week? >> that is the question on everybody's mind. there is a mixture of excitement and nervousness as they gathered for this convention about which is incidentally, under way. these are live pictures from inside the hall as delegates are about to hear from the mayor of los angeles after taking care of business in the opening half hour of the session. what they have to do is answer the question and mitt romney and paul ryan put to america when they appeared last week. they said, ask yourselves, are you better off now than you were four years ago? the old ronald reagan question. it is a question that advisers have struggled with in talk shows over the weekend. you look at the statistics, the answer is no. they are not better off average incomes in the middle class in the together is worse. think of america in a bigger sense is what they will have to say today. we're on an economic price of the spirit of the banking sector was about to topple. the car programs was about to explode. and by the way, we have also killed osama bin laden. it will have to ask america to think about it in bigger macro terms rather than just a microcosm of their own lives. >> and michelle obama speaks tonight. how will she tried to sell her husband to those undecided voters. -- to those undecided voters? >> with their orange-to do this week is to get away from the idea that this is a referendum on barack obama -- what they will have to do this week is to get away from the idea that this is a referendum on barack obama. she laughed and humanize her husband and she will remind him that he comes from a middle- class background and was -- she will have to humanize her husband and your mind the people that he comes right middle class background and was raised by his single mother and his grandparents. >> steve in the center of the action tonight. thank you very much indeed. the chinese foreign minister has warned americans not to take sides in the dispute in the south china sea. hillary clinton arrived in beijing to discuss a range of foreign-policy issues, including syria. however, regional friction between china and allies and the u.s., such as the philippines and japan, could put things at stake. i spoke earlier with the director of research and a senior fellow at the brookings institution china center. china's official news media was very pointed in its criticism of the obama administration, and indeed, mrs. clinton, ahead of her visit. why the sharp turn? >> there are two main reasons. on the one hand, chinese nationalism is on the rise, particularly with recent events in the eastern china sea and the south china sea. they believe that is -- that the u.s. is taking sides supporting japan. secondly, they are angry about the obama administration's argument that puts china down and therefore, they think it is time to express in china's national concern. and the government does not want to seem weak when dealing with these very important issues about territorial integrity, etc. they want tough talk. otherwise, public opinion will be very critical. >> can you explain why the job -- the south china sea is such a source of tension between washington and beijing? >> many countries are in the south china sea, particularly the philippines, are very concerned about chinese mobilization. they want the u.s. involved to back the asian pacific. at the same time, the chinese government because of china's strength and leverage, they want to be tough, particularly when chinese public opinion is very critical about the government approach. therefore, they argue that the south china sea is a core interest for china. they want to see it defended aggressively. >> the u.s. is deploying more military hardware to the pacific, which has upset the chinese. is it all a struggle for influence? >> not only for invalids, but also resources, as china becomes very important. although, some of the things are exaggerated in western media because china still has a long way to go. but there is tension escalating for both governments and both governments should be careful to determine which way is the right one. the asia-pacific region is so big. we should have a long-term vision to talk about cooperation, rather than engaging this arms race rather than attention, and maybe even war in that region. >> thank you for helping us understand why that this is so important. >> thank you. >> here is a story that shocked the nation and exposed growing social tensions being felt across the country. a paralyzed man in china has blown himself up in a government office following a long term dispute with government officials. at the six government officials were injured in the blast. our correspondent visited the man's village and he sent this report. >> this is normally a peaceful corner of china. but on monday, one man left the village for the last time. he blew himself up in a nearby government office. wheelchair-bound, his brother said he had been left paralyzed after an accident and a building site. for years, he wanted mowry compensation, but never got a response from officials. >> he could not make ends meet. no one wants to die, but he was desperate, and that is why he did this. >> walt this is an extreme case, there have been a rising number of attacks on local officials in recent years. this is a dramatic illustration of the growing social tensions being felt across china. >> there are thousands of protest every month. many are angry about the official corruption and abuses of power. china's leaders warned that these issues are eroding their of the authority of the ruling communist party. local officials deny any wrong doing in this man's case. six of them were injured in the blast at this office. they say he had made friends before -- threats before. police are searching and finding explosives in his own home. but despite this, his brother believes officials are appalled. he said if they have followed the rule of law, his brother would still be alive. what happened is one story in china, but also what one man was prepared to do in order to get his point across. >> in other news, a court in bahrain has held up lengthy prison sentences for 20 activists involved in last year's pro-democracy protests. the verdict issued by a military court included eight life sentences. the court's decision may still be appealed. the united nations refugee agency has warned of a rapid deterioration in syria as thousands continue to flee the violence. more than 100,000 syrians fled the country last month alone, the highest monthly total since the conflict began in march last year. a suicide bomber in afghanistan as kelly's 25 and wounded 50 others. a mourner infiltrated -- the bomber infiltrated as a bit more -- as a mourner. police that fear someone could get killed if the violence continuing to write third night. rioters continue as they are trying to keep factions apart. >> keeping relations peaceful in belfast has proved impossible. it is mainly catholics on one side and protestants on the other. hard-line elements on both sides of the rooms have been involved in the recent violence. police came under attack as they tried to keep loyalists and republic crowds apart. in total, more than 60 officers have been hurt this week, all in the same part of northern belfast. today, police made a short, but direct, appeal. >> we need an urgent resolution of this issue or there is a real possibility that somebody will be killed in the next few days. >> tensions have grown as a loyal hispanic is accused of -- as a loyalist band is accused of action outside a local church. some said they feel left behind by the peace process. >> we are still suffering and people in the u.s. have not grasp that. some can say they have moved on. some parts of the province have move on. our community has not. >> patty was born in 1994, the same year as the ira cease-fire. but he thinks permanent peace is still a long way off. >> there are people my age that do get involved. they have been brought up in a community where they have always gotten involved and that is the only reason they do. it is not by choice. >> tonight in belfast, the hope is that the worst of their recent trouble is over. violence has been confined to one part of belfast. it has not spread across the city. that suggests that despite the ongoing problems, the peace process still has firm foundations. but in the flash point area, the danger remains. traffic is still passing through, but more than 100 police officers are standing by just in case. they are stuck in the middle of northern ireland's divided society. >> you are watching bbc world news america. still to come, prepared to be wowed by these little fellows as they make their first public appearance. police in india have carried out raids in 10 cities as part of an investigation into alleged corruption in the allocation -- allegations of coal mining corruption. they have filed cases against five mining companies. a recent report by government officers said the country has lost more than $30 billion because materials have been sold to cheaply. coalgate, calling it an emerging scandal over the lucrative rights to mine coal that took place between 2006-09. the report says the bids were sold cheaply. billions of dollars may have been lost as a result. the government has defended its policy. but it has ordered a crackdown against those who may have benefited. >> the policy of allocating coal blocs is 100% fare. this was made by the prime minister of india and he had the right to the implement it. it was also made by the highest government officials. but we have some government -- as some companies that have falsified information to get their rights. that is why we're looking into it. it is their job to take action against such companies. >> the man in the firing line is the indian prime minister. the head of the cold ministry at the time of the controversy rosales. the opposition says he was in charge, and therefore, he has to go. mr. singer has rejected the charges and their minds that he he must resign. this is the latest in the high- profile corruption scandals in india. public anger is growing, and with national elections due in 2014 to my time is running out for the government. >> emergency services in portugal tonight as hot temperatures and strong winds threatened to spread new wildfires. two major fires order of the weekend in the north of the country have now been put out, but it took some help to put the fires out. >> firefighters are troubling to bring a huge fire under control. three active fronts and fires in factories are causing panic among the public. >> on the when the fire was around the house to the firefighters arrived. we were here alone. the helicopter arrived 10 minutes ago. >> thousands of firefighter have been engaged in the effort to contain these latest wild fires as well as here in the center of the country. some 20 separate fires broke out on sunday, fuelled by strong winds and high temperatures. the weather conditions are expected to remain the same for the next few days. here, too, they're wearing for residents whose homes are potentially in that path of -- they are worried for the residents whose homes are potentially in the path of the flames. >> there are a lot of small villages throughout this region. >> on monday, this russian built water carrying helicopter crashed as it was trying to douse the flames. now spain has but sent two aircraft, as well as france, to help. it is more than a threat. one man in his 50's was found burned to death, apparently trying to save his chicken farm. interior ministers said the conditions have produced what firefighters are calling it perfect storm. >> it was one of the most important moments in french history. and no one knows for sure where it happened. the battle of magi was where julius caesar fought the -- the battle of malaysia was where julius caesar fought the gauls. others said the side of the battle is 100 miles away. >> @ france's newest attraction marking its oldest battle, you can see what it was like to witness and fight at the siege of a vcr. it was supposedly here in burgundy that the gauls and their chief were beaten by julius caesar, bringing france into the room in orbit, and inspiring the nation's collective memory ever since. the recreations are impressive, the archaeology's seems conclusive. there's only one problem. what is the actual battle never took place here at all? 100 miles away in the juror department, a group of enthusiasts is convinced there has been a massive historical fraud. >> based on a literal reading of an only contemporary source, caesars own, they say the site cannot be in burgundy, but here not far from the swiss border. the indigent -- indigenous people on the hilltops and caesar on the valley floor. >> you can see the two rivers and the hill, which is high. it is 3,000 feet long. everything is there. it did not change for two dozen years. >> they say they found traces of a roman siege camp, which they are analyzing with archeological techniques. and it remains on an agent roman citadel to regattas. and there is a ramp are wall 10 meters high. >> what they say is that not just the battle took place here, but that there was an extremely caltech gaulish the city that was very important. if that is true, then it is one of the largest unexplored archaeological sites in europe. >> it is true, it would be amazing, implying a cover-up on the level of officials. back at the burgundy side, more than a century and statue has looked out over the plane. >> and now for something else you do not see every day. three indian white tiger cubs have gone on public display in the czech republic. they do not have names yet, but after seeing the pictures, there is no doubt that many will volunteer their ideas. >> when you are just a few weeks old and white with black stripes, it is pretty easy to be spotted. these three rehr indian white tigers have been introduced to the public in the czech republic for the first time, and they seem to be lapping up the attention. the cubs were born in july to their mother at the only zoo in the country to a successfully bred white tigers. >> we have put
WETA
Sep 12, 2012 6:00pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. american dems the attack on the consulate in libya -- condemns the attack on the consulate in libya. >> how could this happen in a country we helped liberate and the city we helped saved from destruction. >> killed for being gay. authorities in iraq are behind the systematic persecution of homosexuals, and capturing the world in color a century after usmovies broke out in black and white, the first films are being discovered. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. no american ambassador has been killed in the line of duty since 1979, but today the flags haveeen put at half mast in honor of chris stevens. the u.s. ambassador and three other diplomats were killed in the raid. the white house is investigating whether the attacks were planned, and president obama has promised to bring the killers to justice. >> in the darkness and confusion, witnesses said the area was cordoned off by heavily armed men. the attack was linked with an american film the attackers then insulting the prophet mohammed. >> we have to stop this. stopping the film is our hope. >> by the morning the u.s. consulate in bengasi was in ruins, but this was not the first attack. in june the convoy was hit. no one was killed, and the un has also been targeted. the u.s. ambassador christopher stephens started his time as envoy to anti-gaddafi rebels. the libyan government said he was killed by old regime loyalists. they speculated the attack might have been to mark the anniversary of 9-11. >> there is no justification to this. the world must stand together to reject these acts. already many libyans have joined us in doing so, and these will not break the bonds between the united states and libya. >> the new prime minister has just been named after the recent elections, but the killing shows that in and when a new libya, armed groups continue to act seemingly with impunity. in cairo, demonstrators are blaming the u.s. for the film. it is a challenge for the muslim-lead government which has condemned the film while calling for protests. in libya the government will want this type of demonstration, pro america but against the film. the danger that in might be viewed across the region as legitimate anchor. -- anger. >> i am joined by the u.s. state official who served as the president of the council on foreign relations. we do not know the motives behind the attack, but what we do know is this is a very unstable country. we have a government that is moderate or pro-american, but that is not true of everyone. >> it underscores the reality it is one thing to out of authoritarian regimes, and it is something -- to ask authoritarian regimes, and it is something different to meet international obligations, one of which is to provide safety for diplomatic missions. >> you think it is realistic to ask a country that has effectively just been through a civil war to be able to fulfill its obligations? the libyan government barely has a police force and an army at its disposal. >> we can argue if it is realistic, but it is necessary. if you are going to have tourists and investment, you have got to be able to provide the basics of security. we are not going to ask them to protect every part of their territory, but high targetted places like the u.s. embassy or consulate, particularly on 9-11, it seems that is not a stretch that is a particular target, but it is also possible that is simply a mob that was targeted or whether it is more premeditated by a terrorist offshoots. >> whatever the cause we will learn as time unfolds. it is a bit early to speculate right now, and what it highlights is a quandary for american foreign policy in opposed arab spring region, which is still very volatile. >> absolutely, and going forward the united states is going to have to deal with this. to what extent do we make foreign assistance conditional? if so, on what kinds of behavior is? this is not limited to libya of. this is going to be the case in cairo with egypt's going forward. this is going to be an extremely difficult diplomatic process. there are going to be moments of instability, and this is not going to be short lived. i think we are talking about years and decades of uneasy relationships with regimes that are unable or unwilling to be a partner with the united states. >> you have often said this is going to take time, but we have seen what protests in tunis, protests in libya, protests in egypt, you think the washington establishment has come up with a convincing way of dealing with the arab world in light of the arab spring? >> the short answer is no. part of the middle east is i believe there is a reduction of influence for all outsiders. there is also reduction of influence for authority. it is not clear what governments can control, so i think it is going to be a difficult time for the united states and for everyone, but what is not going to changes how vulnerable we are to what comes from the region, so it is a terrible combination where we have tremendous interest yet limited capacity to protect them, exactly what you do not want in foreign policy, that is exactly what the reality is. >> thank you for joining me from new york. now to pakistan were 290 people are thought to have died when a fire swept through a factory. it is one of the worst industrial accidents in the country's history. many were unable to escape because the building had no alarms and no sprinklers. the blaze happened in the city of karachi. >> coming to recover the dead, many lost their lives in the basement of the factory. there are desperate calls heading to be saved, and among the victims, three young sisters who died together, their family now in morning like so many others. she knows both her daughters may have lost their husbands. they said take care of yourselves and the children. we do not know if we will make it home. dozens survived by jumping from the rules or of her stories. a crane made a hole in the wall, and i jumped, but five of my relatives were trapped inside. this is the inferno from which he escaped. the windows have metal grills. police say most of the workers did not stand a chance. >> there wasthe exit, and all the people got trapped. >> there is still a search for bodies. officials say many of those who died have come to collect their wages. tonight rescue workers are still there. employees say it was a death trap, but as is often the case, the authorities allowed it to remain open. relatives are asking if anyone will be held to account. >> the russian president medvedev are calling for three members of the event was the right -- the band pussy riot to be free. they were sentence after performing of prayer in moscow 's casino asking the virgin mary to save them. prime minister david cameron has apologized for police failure in 1989 and a cover-up that followed. there have been two explosions outside a hotel where the newly elected somali president is based. the president himself is unharmed, but for members of security forces are reported to have been killed. the militant group al-shabaab has claimed responsibility. iraq has struggled to protect its people, but some of the population has suffered more than others. now law enforcement agencies are actively involved in the persecution of homosexuals. hundreds of gay men and women died in killings. >> the list first appeared in the streets of baghdad saturday. in the name of god the merciful, the four warned. they gave name and address those. by 2009, the witch hunt had begun. >> we had cases where heads were cut off or head-. -- heads bashed. >> they think by killing them they are closing society in -- cleansing society. " this is a story of modern-day iraq where young men and women are killed for being gainey. a lot has changed since i was last here. american troops are gone. explosion still happen. while this is a dangerous city, the streets are a lot more normal, but what has also changed is for one group of people, baghdad is more dangerous than ever before. hiding from the police in a baghdad safe house, what have we done that is so wrong, nancy asks. she is gay. that alone can get you killed in iraq. murders of days by militiamen in iraq have been well-documented, but evidence shows the government is complice it in a systematic and organized persecution of homosexuals. he came to warn to find his boyfriend in one of the cells. there was no arrest warrant and nothing they could do to help him. >> being gay is not a legal in iraq. they said, we must kill you all. >> 2 days later, his boyfriend is dead. now they received the first threat in february after the media reported dozens of young men were being killed in baghdad. in iraq, they are associated with gays. the interior ministry responded by saying he had to be eradicated. the united nations confirmed 12 deaths. the u.n. believes the real number is much higher. the accounts of 17 caveman -- gay men are consistent. all of them say the interior minister statement sparked a new wave. the government denies there is an issue. >> this is like telling a black person not to be black. >> that person by nature is black. >> what is homosexuality? a laxative not by nature. it is behavior. -- >> it is not by nature. it is behavior. >> activists say of to 1000 gay men and women have been killed in iraq since 2004, most of them in recent years. here is why some believe the targeted killings are destroying the promise of free iraq. >> if one person does not feel safe common they will kill them. when they finish him, they will turn to the second person. they will come and kill you, and nobody will speak. if we stay quiet about the killing of a gay person, the woman will be killed. the marginalized will be killed. other minorities will be killed, and none of us will be around. >> it's like we do not exist, she says jermaine -- to me. the government does not want them to exist. they are investigating the targeted killings of homosexuals in iraq. still to come, germany's top court clears the way for the country to ratify europe's new bailout fund, but the relief comes with strings attached. scientists say they are a step closer to finding a cure to some types of deafness is successfully used embryonic stem cells to reverse hearing loss. >> these nerve cells and now under the microscope are hoping they can one gain in rivers they were created by stem cells of have the ability to turn into any tissue. in this condition, nerve cells in the inner ear are damaged, preventing sound from traveling along the auditory nerve to the brain like cutting a telephone wire. researchers through stem cells -- grew stem cells into healthy replacement nerve cells. they injected these into gerbils, considered a good animal model for human hearing and found out on average 45% of hearing was restored. >> this is proved themselves can be used to repair the damage here, but this is only the beginning. we think this is a good step forward. >> she says she could hear perfectly as a child until she contracted typhoid. she works of the charity but funded research and says she volunteers for any patient trials, but many questions remain, such as does the hearing impairment last. the gerbils to move followed up for 10 weeks, and is it safe? and and and these uncertainties mean patient trials using these cells are still several years away. >> it is not something you hear us say very often, but there was good news for the euro today. voters in the netherlands cast their ballots, and in germany the top court approved german involvement in a bailout fund of indebted eurozone countries. the ruling did have limits, but it is being seen as a way to help stabilize the single currency. >> for a moment today, europe's eyes were on these men and women, the judges of germany's constitutional court. would they declare the new bailout fund illegal? the judges gave the go ahead for a fund seen as essential to fighting the eurozone crisis, so what did the court agreed? it gave the green light to contribute to the permanent bailout fund, with a 500 million-dollar war chest seen as central to helping out troubled eurozone countries. angela merkel arrived at parliament. she knew 37,000 germans had petitioned the court, fearful but control over german budget was being lost. she also knew her european strategy depended on the court backing her. >> i say it is it today for germany and a good day for europe. >> the court did rule if german liabilities were to increase further in parliament would have to give its approval. >> those who petition the court are given new bailout fund emboldens more power is going to eu institutions without proper democratic control. one of the petitioners said the decision to support was bad for german democracy. >> high-end disappointing -- i am disappointed because they finance of the expense of the north and europe. >> even here there are signs the german economy is slowing and support for further bailouts is weakening. at some point enough is enough. germany has its own problems. we should deal with them. >> we are worried germany might also go down. >> european integration is deepening. a first step was taken today towards a full banking union with an aim of economic and political union in the future of your gut -- in the future. >> today we will take going to the cinema to delight in technicolor films for granted. a century ago they were just coming out in black and white. now the earliest moving color pictures ever made have been rediscovered in the north of england. russell little girl with the red sash -- >> a little girl with a , and it is goldfish compan all 110 years old. the film was produced by one of cinemas pioneers, edward turner. his oregon's new he tried to create color film, -- historians new he tried to create color film. then he was given this old can that was sitting on the shelves. >> i opened it, took a little film out now, and i recognize the process. i could not quite believe my eyes. >> he died in 1990 through -- 1993 while his idea was only an idea. >> it is the quality of the color that amazes you. this also tells us something else. this is the family. that baby is not yet year-old, so it has to be 19001, 1900 to, the first color -- 1902, the first color moving pictures. that might change other bits of film history. >> we have to go deeper and pull the date for the beginning of the medium slightly further back, because there are other pioneers who made systems they never manage to get projected onto a screen. >> what ever historians make of it, it is a glimpse of 1902 we have never had before. it looks real and not and reflect back to a garden in london when a gunman made history by doing what fathers always do with a new camera -- filming -- when a gunman made history by doing what fathers always do with a new camera -- filming the children. >> that brings us to a close. you can find more on our website. things so much for watching. i will see you tomorrow. -- thanks so much for watching. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. relationship managers work hard operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide decisions. solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Sep 11, 2012 5:30pm EDT
world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Sep 27, 2012 5:30pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington. anchor over austerity, the -- anger over austerity, there is a looming crisis and we tracked down a band of extremists using an anti islamic video as the rallying cry. and why americans woke up when they got away from the interstate highways. hello and welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also run the globe. austerity has become all too familiar in europe, facing spiraling deficits and higher unemployment, spain unleashed drafting spending cuts to date are around $50 billion. it is europe's largest -- fourth largest economy. gavin hewitt has more from madrid. >> lines of police outside the education ministry in madrid tonight. teachers protested here against cuts. they came onto the street at the government's announced the most severe round of budget savings so far. these latest austerity measures are widely seen as paving the way for a full-scale bailout. >> [spending -- speaking spanish] >> the minister of finance said he heard 2012 would be the last year the economy would shrink. another minister described it as a crisis budget designed to exit the crisis. this austerity budget aims to find savings of 40 billion joerres next year. each government department would how to make cuts of 90%. public-sector pay will be frozen for another year, and the retirement age is set to rise. >> just a few weeks ago, europe believed it had achieved a breakthrough. the european central bank said it would help come -- countries like spain by buying their bonds and reducing their borrowing costs. but there was a catch, spain would have to apply for a rescue and it would be strict conditions. but spain has resisted accepting conditions imposed from outside. part of the strategy behind today's budget was to adopt tough measures voluntarily in the hope no more would be needed in the event the country needed a bailout >> when i come to request a bailout, the european union set out conditions. but say, the spanish government is already volunteering to implement those conditions. >> you do not need to travel far to discover the death of spain's problems. this is a population of just 2100 people. its debts are 6 million joerres, however. these public-sector workers are not being paid. >> i have not been paid since october, 2011. -- october, 2011, said this administrator. >> how do you survive without being paid? >> my parents and partner are paying the mortgage. family helps, yes. my parents, i live with them. this week, the frustration has fuelled large protests. the government is caught in a dilemma. the mounting austerity, but it also fears of the humiliation of asking for a bailout. spain may be cutting its spending, but unrest is rising. >> talks between israel and palestine are breaking down completely. speaking in your, but he said they are facing a crisis. >> there can be only one view of the israeli government's actions in our homeland, and it -- and of the position it has provided us with regarding the substantive agreement to end the conflict and achieve peace, that one understanding leads to one conclusion, that the reece daily -- the israeli government rejects the to-state solution >> prime minister benjamin netanyahu then to the stand. he wasted no time in condemning saying its speech, was libelous. he then claimed iran will have enough enriched uranium to make a nuclear bomb by next summer. >> at this late hour, there is only one way to peacefully prevent iran from getting a tobben bomb spirited and that is, by placing a clear red line -- getting atomic bombs. and that is, by placing a clear red line on iran's nuclear program. it redlines do not lead to war. president kennedy set a red line during the cuban missile crisis. it also prevented a war and help preserve the peace for decades. >> for more on the implications of what both leaders said at the u.n., and joined by former state department adviser now at the woodrow wilson center. aaron, thank you for coming in. benjamin netanyahu had a big diagram and relying on it. what happens if iran carries on enriching uranium? >> that is a problem that no one has the answer to. negotiations may have slowed to some degree iran's determination to acquire nuclear weapons capacity, but the truth is, we do not know. israel's default position is clear, if we do not succeed to negotiation, then military strength, preferably by the u.s. >> [indiscernible] >> this is the key. president obama is running for reelection. he understands that the last thing he needs is more uncertainty. oil prices could quadruple. plunging markets, more americans dying in afghanistan as a consequence of iran in troublemaker in -- troublemaking. as of right now, he does not accept the notion that this is a war of necessity. israel believes so, but no one else in the international community right now believes it. >> could there be a difference path for iran? >> i do not know. i suspect the intelligence agencies and the pentagon will provide cautionary tales and lay out their risks of what a unilateral american military strike would be like. this is not a 2012 issue. this will be joined sometime. the prime minister actually stated it -- >> next summer. >> yes. and he has compromised credibility and deterrent capacity because the truth is, no one is going to strike iran most likely until any time next spring. what good is a red line if you do not enforce it? >> just to move on, harsh words from the palestinian president about israeli settlements. not for the first time, but is that peace process completely solve? >> he is confronting a problem he can resolve. mahmoud abbas is frustrated. i would not call him desperate, but he is clearly frustrated. if you got them in the same room and you confronted jerusalem border security refugees, guess what, you have a worse situation that now. you have a complete and utter breakdown and rupture. the palestinian economic situation is not good at all, according to the u.n. palestinian unity remaining with abbas is elusive at best. everybody will wait to see who wins the american elections and whether in the aftermath, president obama, who is very much seized with this issue, will continue to be seized with it. >> thank you very much. world leaders at the u.n. have also debated the line between free speech and religious intolerance following the anti- islamic video. it caused ripples across the muslim world. in pakistan, at least 20 were killed in demonstrations. who exactly are the demonstrators? we are in karachi. >> they have been gathering here every day to pray. for the soul of muhammed, a policeman. become to try to comfort his mother. she said she does not understand why her son, a muslim, became the enemy. his family says that he himself had been upset by the anti-islam video. >> they said this was going to be a peaceful rally for the honor of the prophet. we were shocked to see the terrorist and weapons there. >> the family watched the news channels in horror as the demonstrations became more violent. and then on live tv, they saw their sign being carried from the scene. -- saw their son being carried from the scene. >> during the protests, thousands of demonstrators came up this hill, trying to get access to the american consulate. this is where police were holding them back and it is where muhammed fell. he was one of 15 who died that day in the protests in gratia alone. -- in karachi alone. >> who were the protesters that died? eight were from this extremist group. it is supposed to be banned. the group is thought to have carried out scores of many sectarian attacks over the years. that video has become its latest rallying cry. >> we hold the biggest march and wanted it to be peaceful, says the group's leader in karachi. the violence and conspiracy to stop us from protesting, but even of the world tries to stop but, we will not stop in our cause. >> the 17-year-old lost his life in the cause. the clerics told his mother to be proud and is encouraging other young men to join in, saying it is the only way to send a message to the world. bbc news, rajeev. >> in other news, praised for her efforts to promote democracy, aung san suu kyi. she was thankful for the first time as a nobel laureate and congratulate it on the honor that she recently received in the u.s. as many as 700,000 refugees could have fled syria to neighboring countries by the end of the year. that would mark a huge increase on the previous estimate. already, some 700,000 have left the country. the south sudan split from the north has been a messy divorce. the two nations have fought over oil exports. tensions along the border have seen them come close to war. the presidents of both countries are trying to negotiate a way out. they have struck a deal to resume oil production, but many other issues remain. james explains. >> and shaikh for an agreement, but many questions remain. -- a handshake for an agreement, but many questions remain. they signed the accord after several days of tense negotiations and several months of international pressure. they agree to set up a demilitarized buffer zone along the disputed border. the bulk of the oil is in south sudan, but the pipelines and refineries are in sudan. the two have agreed to reach an agreement to allow transport of oil through sudan to the sea for export. the fierce disagreement over the border has not been resolved and there is no agreement over and -- a region claimed by two ethnic groups. it could be damaging for either side to drop its claim of ownership. >> we want to be sure that the people do not continue in agony because of our pride and arrogance. made the spirit of reason and logic prevailed on ice. >> other issues have been kicked further down the road, despite u.n. calls for a resolution. >> these negotiations have come to an end without finding a conclusive agreement. the african union mediators are calling this a giant step forward, but the sudan and -- for sudan and south sudan to truly have peace, there will need to be many more giant steps to come. >> to china where the artist and government critic ai weiwei has lost his final battle against the tax evasion filing. the record forces him to pay $2.4 million. >> ai weiwei says this is a case he never believed he could win. during his time as -- during a time of protest as an artist, he said he never sought a way to win. >> people say, you knew the results of this from the beginning. that is true. the result today is not the result that should have been given. china should be changing every day, but in truth, this is not happening. we are still living under iran legal system. this system cannot possibly have -- under a rotten legal system. at the system cannot possibly have a place in the future. >> he is also an outspoken critic of the ruling communist party. his high-profile case is carefully watched to see how chinese leaders deal with the scent. last year, he was secretly detained for 81 days, sparking international condemnation. following his release, his firm was charged with tax evasion. he believed the charges were politically motivated, designed to silence him. authorities would not allow him to attend proceedings, so instead, his wife attended on his behalf. but now he has lost his final appeal and will need to pay a massive fine. >> ai weiwei has labelled china's legal system as backward and barbaric. he said he will not pay the outstanding tax fight against him -- tax find against him, and that is a move that is likely to put him on a collision authorities there. >> you are watching bbc world news america. still to come, who said electric cars are slow? we are on the racetrack of the uk team as they attempt to put the record straight. it seems like the familiar tale of a father wanting to find a loving husband for his daughter, but the story is far more complicated than it appears. offers have flooded in from around the world after a man offered a large reward to marry his daughter. but there is one issue, his daughter is a lesbian. >> this is just one of the thousands of marriage proposals is just one issue. the daughter of the property tycoonthat gigi chao has receiv. why? because her father, a hong kong billionaire, has offered $54 million to the man who can successfully woo her. but there is already taken. she entered into a single partnership with her girlfriend of seven years in paris five months ago. the guay daughter of one of the richest men in hong kong have laughed off her father's plan. >> which is thought it was a joke or something like that. and i was not angry or anything. as time went on, soon, i realized it is really his expression of love, his expression of fatherly love. gregg's her father's marriage county has grabbed a worldwide attention, and the daughter of the hong kong billionaire said she has been bombarded with marriage proposals. is this a waste of time? >> i am really close to my dad and we talk very intimately about our lives and relationships and the future of the daily and the office. >> if this marriage offer appeals to you, it looks like you have to join the queue. bbc news. >> the puck -- the price of petrol has soared, some electric cars have become more popular. but it can seem a bit slow. a team in the u.k. wants to show that they can be green and swift. today, they set a new speed record. john acquire -- john mcguire reports. >> this is no milk float. nick haunting is at the wheel of a vehicle that may not sound like a super car, but certainly behaves like one. the speed on the first leg tops 145. nick, this is john, go, go, go. and on the return mile, he goes even faster, setting a new record of 140 miles per hour. they have done it, have they? they have done it? yes, they have done it. congratulations, you have broken the record. >> but what is it like to drive? >> it is very different. it is phenomenally quick. it feels different to any racing car or road car that i have driven. the acceleration is phenomenal. it is probably one of the quickest cars are driven. it is quicker than a be-while for raleigh. -- a v-12 ferrari. >> the company behind it, ec otricity is a clean energy firm and wants to challenge the concept that all grain cars are slow. >> they are not the kinds of things that normally, he would drive. they are super cars. they are as good as anything else on the road today. >> we brit have long harbored a the previous record, set by the grandson of sir malcolm campbell, a family name synonymous with speed records. the new record has to be officially ratified, but it is, they will have achieved it not with a bang, but with a whistle. >> it is not just speed reconnect with cars. in the 1950's, the u.s. began building a huge system of highways. before the concrete with even dry, the internet -- the interstate became an airey place. a series of killings makes the highway fragging. what author describes the uneasy relationship americans continue to have with their roads. >> really, the first person to be seen nationally as a highway killer was a down juvenile delinquent named charles stark weather. he was 17 and went on the road in 1958 with his underage girl friend, carol and fugate. -- carol ann fugate. in their flight across nebraska, they killed a total of 11 people. people linked it very clearly as a sign of where the culture was going, a sign of the kind of audit mobility -- automobility and lack of values and ruthlessness that were representative of the highways that were at that point just beginning to be built across the nation. i decided to write, "killer on the road to" because i started writing out about the interstate highway system and then the killers kind of took over. the interstate in the beginning was the route to all possible -- to all best possible worlds. people got the notion early on that there was something about the roads that was scary, and that there were people stalking them are haunting them. and that first step of anxiety settled on hitchhikers, the idea that it could potentially be a murderer you were letting into your car. in fact, the danger was almost entirely to the hitchhiker from the driver. the hitch hiking counterculture release of the interstate highway system as a completely different thing. they side rather than in the nation as a place of connection. there were people who preyed upon hitchhikers, one of the most infamous being at kemper, who worked out of santa cruz and picked up hitchhiking when men and murdered them. one of those who benefited from the construction of the interstate highway system was trucking. interestingly, this, too has led to a rise in violence. the fbi recently announced an initiative called the highway serial killings initiative in which they are tracking unidentified remains and murders along the interstate highways that can actually be linked together our highway system. -- by the highway system. the vast majority of victims are, in fact, long-haul truckers. 90% of these murders are murders of truck stop prostitute. i have no doubt we will continue to have an uneasy relationship with the interstate highways. i think americans love the roads and they hate them. i think people have an affection for old route 66, but there is no affection for i 40. there is a sense in which the highways are sold less places. we use them, we need them, but we do not love them or relate to them. correct no hitchhiking on a highway for me. that -- >> no hitchhiking on the highway for me. becher in today's show to a close. tomorrow, kathy kaye will bring us a special edition of the news live from brazil. >> i'm in sao paulo, looking at whether the brazilian education system can keep up with the demands that are growing in its economy or will it hold them back? will have a live report tomorrow. >> you can find constant updates on our website. make sure to visit our facebook page. i'm laura trevelyan. the problem was a bbc world news america, thank you for watching. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Sep 28, 2012 4:00pm PDT
>> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is a special edition of the "bbc world news america from brazil." it is the biggest economic power house in south america but can brazil build its future without investing? questions about air safety after a plane bound for mount everest crashes after takeoff. and we meet a writer from rita -- rider from rio who is starting a new trend. welcome to "bbc world new america" from brazil. this mitropoulos behind me is a country that is reverberating in economic growth. brazil recently overtook the united kingdom to become the sixth largest economy. perhaps it is no wonder that the british prime minister has come to town to drum up trade. he is leading a delegation and in the past few hours, he met with the president in the capital. but brazil faces many challenges. there are signs that its economic growth is slowing and inflation is on the rise. when it comes to education, brazil ranks 53rd in the world. it is an issue the country needs to address so it can seize its momentum not be left on the sideline. and downtown, there are throwing up the buildings at a dizzying pace. but it takes more than muscle to lift the country. all of this prosperity was built on natural resources but of the country wants to do more than supply commodities to china, it needs human helped to. >> you will not find many skilled workers on the streets. it is here in the poor neighborhoods, not far from the business district, that you find that challenge. if this country ever wants to develop from an emerging economy, it is going to have to do a better job educating its population. gdp but the six largest and blow in education. >> she is an education campaign and fighting vested interest to change those figures. >> the political issue in brazil, there are 2 million voters that can decide an election. it is very hard to make changes. >> it is time for school in this neighborhood. this is the second session of the day. brazil has done a good job getting more children into the education system that now there are not enough schools is like many, this one runs three ships. it is progress. a lot of the children come from families that hardly had any education. this boy says his mother only studied until fourth grade and he is not sure but maybe his father made it to fit. this girl is determined to go all the way through college and says studying is the path for the future. that ambition and gives her a challenge. her own training was minimal. she stepped into her first-class room with no practical experience and it was terrifying. with minimal resources, this school is trying hard but if it cannot provide the skilled work force to satisfy the demands of the economy, brazilian companies will look elsewhere for labor. >> it is a big, busy city. >> they will look for people like this person working as a head hunter. >> brazil has a huge demand of technical professionals to fight for the growth of the country. the problem is not to construct, it is when you need to construct a more complex construction, for example, a dam or a highway. >> or even a world cup stadium. for the big games in 2014, they're building a showcase to the future. it needs educated brazilians to make that future success. and what an impressive stadium it is. can brazil build that an educated workforce? i am joined by the professor of economics. thank you for joining me. do you think it is possible for brazil to do what it needs to educate its workforce? >> it is possible to do it. the a brazilian workforce is not very well educated. the quality of education is low. but it is possible to improve our education by investing our resources. we should improve the performance of our teachers. >> wages are very low, $10,000 a year. >> they are very low. in order to improve the situation, we need to lead the way of the performance. but teachers that are there every day doing a good job, they're getting better paid and improving in their career. if you pay everyone the same, there is no way they're going to put more effort. >> let's put this in the context of the other brics. order they doing that brazil is not doing? >> there is the example of china, for example. people think shanghai has done with very well. those other emerging economies are growing a lot based on productivity. brazil has been growing by employing more people but now unemployment is very low. the only way we can grow further in the future is by improving our productivity. in order to do that we have to introduce new innovation and technology. the only way to do that is having a more qualified work force. >> i want to put to use something one economist said to me, which is that you can account for brazil's growth rate recently with one word, that is china. is that sustainable? >> that is not really sustainable in the long run. china will continue to grow at this rate. in order to grow, brazil has to do something on their own. we have to do our own homework. that is investing in the quality of education, improving our systems. the productivity has been stagnant. >> i want to put a different point of view to you. i have been here a few days and you live here. it does not feel like the city in the grips of an economic slowdown. i see people in the streets. people are spending money. this feels like a confident country. >> we are confident. the prospective of growth is reasonable. we are going to grow. the question is, how fast? 4%? or at to 7% by china and india? because we do not have a well- educated work force. that is the main impediment to growing more. if we want to grow like china and india, we will have to do more than just to employ more people. >> thank you very much for having me in this great city. i had a great time while i have been here. while economic growth is starting to slow, it is still very much the envy of the rest of the world. yesterday we reported on spending cuts in spain, the country is struggling under a mountain of debt. today it was determined it is going to balance its books. >> france tonight, learning the details of one of its toughest budgets and 30 years. ministers met to decide how to fix a large hole in the finances and reduce the deficit. the richest households and the biggest companies would bear most of the pain. >> this is a fighting budget to restore the country to health. this is fighting a debt. >> the budget will lead to savings of 30 billion euros next year. that is less than 2% of the economic output. public spending will be frozen. care will be higher taxes on those earning over $1 million. they will be taxed at 75%. he is a new media person and a millionaire and he believes the higher taxes will send a message that france is not open for business. >> the risk is not only that talent will leave the country but the young ones with talent will leave the country. >> this week has seen the paris motor show. hard selling in tough times. the french economy is stagnating and workers are being laid off. eight thousands at peugeot alone. some argue that if france is to grow again, it needs radical reform. >> in france, we must do everything for the future to have our industry competitive. beyond retreat -- restructuring, we have one of the highest. >> many of these workers face redundancy. the government says growth will return next year. others say the government has missed an opportunity to reduce state spending and make it easier to hire and fire workers. today's budget hearing reflects a deeper unresolved problem with the eurozone. as we have seen, other countries like spain and greece have been struggling to reduce spending even while their economies are weak or in recession. >> and other things europeans might envy in brazil, they have so much money in the government that response to the slowdown is a stimulus package that has been announced. in other news, ahead of britain posting a financial watchdog has announced a reform to the setting of libor, the benchmark interest rate. the review was commissioned after a fine was imposed on barclays for trying to rig the rate. now to nepal where a plane has crashed killing all 19 people on board. the aircraft caught fire within two minutes before taking off. it is the second fatal accident this year and once again the country's safety record is in the spotlight. >> a journey to the himalayas ending in tragedy. eyewitnesses say the plane was already on fire before it crashed. emergency markers put the flames out. but the damage was so intense that hopes of finding survivors faded. all 19 people on board were killed. the plane was flying from katmandu. it took off at 1/4 past 6:00 and after two minutes in the air it crashed about a kilometer from the airport. it is dark now and not easy make out parts of the aircraft. this is where it came down. in the distance, you can see the lights of the airport. you get a sense of how quickly all of this must have happened. the last few terrifying moments before the plane came down. this is the plane that set off this morning with this person on board. >> there is no real words of comfort for my daughter, for myself. we're hanging on to the facts that he died doing something he always wanted to do and we're trying very hard to take comfort. >> it is a trip thousands take every year. and mountaineers are surprised it crashed so close to the airport. among the victims was stephen holding, and raymond ego. his brother was also killed along with christopher davey. bits of twisted metal is all the remains. tonight it was announced that investigators would go to nepal to assist in determining what caused the crash. >> after months of speculation, china has drawn a line under its biggest scandal in decades. bo xilai has been expelled from the communist party. >> he was an exception. bo xilai, film to 15 years ago, when he was mayor. popular, charismatic, and at ease on camera. >> this is the biggest city in china but i hope to create the best. >> he became the commerce minister and one of the two dozen people who run china. but the communist party says all along he was corrupt. the news announced he will go on trial. it said he had abused his power, taking bribes and done serious damage to the image of china. the trigger for the downfall, the death in china last year of the british businessman neil ha yward. his wife was found guilty of murder and he is accused of trying to cover-up for crime. but not everybody believes the case is simple. one of the top forensic scientist told the bbc in her opinion there is no evidence he was poisoned with cyanide. >> there were no signs of cyanide. it would harm caused immediate debt. his skin should have patches. his blood should have been a bright red. >> whatever the truth, the party will install new leaders in november who will rule for the next decade. bo xilai will not be one of them. the communist party has been tainted by this scandal. it now wants to wrap it up. the prosecuting of bo xilai will raise more questions. how did he get away with so much for so long? and can the communist party really clean itself up? >> you are watching "bbc world new america," and still to come, from surfing to selling, a resident -- one resident is making a million-dollar business from his life at the beach. venezuela' s president is running for president. he still wants to extend his 14 year rule but this time he faces a candidate from the united opposition that was causing problems. >> reaping the benefits of hugo social rosa's -- revolution in the capital. using the oil revenue, the government subsidizes food and offers the country's poor health care and education. life has changed for everyone says the president came into power. there has been a complete turnaround. we're trying to do everything so it can continue like this. >> he enjoys a cult status among his supporters. a charismatic public speaker with a common touch, he comes off as a champion of the port. but his battle with cancer highlighted how much the success of the ruling socialist party relies on one man. >> were he to suffer ill health again, with no obvious successor, doubts could affect the collection. >> he is also facing competition from this man. the young lawyer says he will -- he is standing as a candidate for a coalition of 30 political parties. president chavez is loved by supporters and hated by opponents. his influence has spread beyond the borders but for the first time he is facing a real challenge of the ballot box. >> canyon and somali troops are fighting for control for the port city of kismayo. the government is expected to take the city soon but a spokesman says they are fighting back in defending themselves. our east africa correspondent now reports. >> of the kenyan military said its forces launched their attacks in the early hours of friday morning fighting alongside somali soldiers. they made advances on kismayo by land and sea. the spokesman said they had met no resistance. it appears to be confined to the oscars. residents have said they see no soldiers of advancing in said the city. last week, al-shabaab appeared to be making preparations for an exit. but it seems likely they will not relinquish kismayo without a fight. kismayo is the last urban stronghold. the port is a crucial issue -- a source of revenue for whoever controls it. losing it could be a blow to the islamists. but does not necessarily mean the end of a al-shabaab. much of the countryside is under their control. their fighters have withdrawn from towns and cities only to strike back with bombings, shootings, and tactics of asymmetric warfare. this looks like the beginning of the end for al-shabaab's control of urban somalia. the question is, what happens then? the challenge will be to reassure residents as well as juggle the interest of local militias and for the kenyan troops who look ready to take control of kismayo, that may prove to be harder than the capture of the city itself. >> we will come back very shortly but now brazil will cemented its place on the sporting stage when it hosts the world cup in 2014 and the olympics two years later. rio is already the most visited city in the southern hemisphere and one of its main attractions are in speeches. this resident knows them too well. .e has built a career he as been speaking to the bbc about it. ♪ >> it is like the place where surfing was born in brazil. i grew up here. i saw people surfing and i got the hook immediately. >> he became a professional surfer in the 1980's and later a journalist writing about the sport. sitting on the sand, something clicked. >> watching all around and i saw the people were very conservative. they were wearing conservative clothes. i thought that we were not wearing the proper clothes to reflect the environment. i had to put some color into it. i have to put some interesting prints into it. >> he brought fashion sensibility to the beach. the clothing brent became a hit as residents -- when it started. today it has 10 shops. the slogan, brazilian flavor. >> this is my favorite right now. i am in love with the sport. >> his apartment has the same casual style. he traveled to indonesia for surfing and began selling them to chain stores. >> i was designing some interesting prince and they would not buy them. they always wanted the little fish are the coconut tree or the sun. it became boring to me. they only chose conservative prince. i think that maybe i should try to start my own brand. so i opened my first store. rio is such an interesting culture. we do not have to hire marketing directors or agencies to see what is the new trend in what is going to happen. all you have to do is drw on your own experience in city. >> when you confined more on that story on our web site and the top news of the day, from us here in sao paulo, thank for watching this edition of "bbc world new america" live from sao paulo. thanks for watching. have a great weekend. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding of this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in to help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailor solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. - i love strawberries! and today we're going to the enchanted garden to pick some! and then we're going to learn how crayons are made at the crayon factory! i'm so glad you're coming with us! be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. hood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - good morning, neighbour! (yawning) strrrretch with me! reach your hands up, like this! stretch, stretch, stretch. rrrah! that felt grr-ific! come on inside!
PBS
Sep 26, 2012 4:00pm PDT
>> and now, "bbc world news america." >> haunting stories emerge from syria. a special report on the widespread use of sexual violence, including rape. running battles in athens as police confront protesters angry at the new round of severe government cutbacks. author j.k. rowling reveals her new book and her regrets about writing to of her most famous novel so quickly. >> there were times when it was really tough, and i read them and i think, maybe i will go back and do it over. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. two massive bomb blast have shaken the syrian capital today setting the military headquarters of light. bombs and bullets are not the only weapons in this war. we heard firsthand evidence of rape being used to emulate and a great victims -- used to humiliate victims. graphic attacks are taking place. >> is just one of the many roads along which they fully. these are among the quarter of a million refugees of syria's war. they bring with them a handful of belongings and stories of crimes that haunt the survivors. this woman said she was arrested at a checkpoint and later repeatedly raped, along with three other women. >> a daily rape took place in front of the other girls. that was the time that would remove the blindfolds so that the girls could see what was happening before their eyes and would not know when their turn would come, whether tomorrow, after one hour. they did not know. it was done in rotation. >> the witness says the rakes happened in the notorious palestine branch in a building later bombed by rebels. she said an interrogator use rats and mice in his violent assaults on her and other women. >> she was screaming. afterwards, we saw blood on the floor. he told merkel, -- he told her, is this good enough for you? they were marking her. it was obvious that she was in agony. you could see her. after that, she no longer moved. but the witness says that after two months in the nightmare world of the tension, she was helped to escape and lease area. the group human rights watch says sexual violence is used to humiliate and the grade. neither they nor the u.s. have so far made allegations of rape against the rebel side. we have talked with victims of rape and the people who have given the medical help. what is clear is that sexual violence is taking place across syria and is being directed at women and men. >> they hit you. >> these young men were arrested in damascus after taking part in demonstrations against the regime. this.aid please don't do please don't do this. nobody listened to me. you want to have freedom? this this for freedom. and then the officer and the security, they are just laughing. i was alone. >> would follow this allegation of abuse across the region, here to easton told. -- here to istanbul. the young man recently defected to the opposition. he said there was rape and other centers. let me quote to you what a former detainee at your facility said. they work raping me. they were like animals. that is from a detainee at the center you ran. >> that is not true when it comes to the time that i was there. that is absolutely untrue. and if it were true, they could confront me, because i am responsible before any authority, whether national or international. >> the international community gives aid to refugees but is simply too divided over syria to order zero war crimes investigation. we ask the syrian government to respond to the allegation, but received no answer. recently dismissed un reports of torture, including sexual violence as neither accurate nor objective. in essence of other witnesses and with un investigators refused access to syria, it is impossible to cooperate rape allegations, but some survivors are determined. >> nobody visits you. nobody here is your voice. it seems this is our destiny to be tortured today and then die. >> in this society, there is a huge degree of shame around speaking about a subject like this. why have you decided to speak to me? >> i am still afraid for the girls who remain inside. every few days, they would bring in new girl. i have now been out for six or seven months. how many girls have they brought in during this time? >> that as the war escalates is the most haunting of questions. >> of the trauma of the syrian direct victims. for those inside the country, it seems the situation gets worse every day. syrian state television has broadcast what it says are secret tv pictures of one of two suicide car bomb outside the heavily guarded building. it was engulfed in flames. gunfire followed the explosions and security forces battle with rebel fighters who then tried to storm the building. the new egyptian president made his debut, saying he will not rest until the civil war in syria and. he told the general assembly it continues to be imposed -- opposed to foreign intervention. >> to pursuing a sincere effort and has been making to put an end to the tragedy in syria within an arab, regional, an international framework. a framework that preserve the unity of this brotherly state. it would involve all sections of the syrian people, without discrimination based on race, religion, or politics. it would spare assyria the danger of foreign military intervention, which we oppose, of course. >> president morsi geoghegan impassioned speech about the fruits of freedom and dignity. he said the u.s. has to address the phenomena of islamic phobia. michael, thanks for being with us. what did you make of his decision to put the palestinian question brought and center in his speech? >> i think it would have been surprising if he did not begin with the question of palestine. this has been traditionally not only in egypt but in the arab world the preeminent foreign policy issue of the region. now that the muslim brotherhood and its president is in power, i think it would have been surprising if they did not showcase this issue, because obviously it has formed a big part of their foreign policy thinking for years. >> egypt received $1.6 billion in aid a year from the u.s. if egypt has a where your relation with the u.s., will that a continue? >> it is an interesting moment when egypt is partially reconstructing it shrek -- its relation with the united states. the military relationship continues, and that has gone on for many years. yet now there is an elected civilian president that is trying to assert the degree of independence at a moment when both sides are now trying to understand the priorities of each other, and the united states is adjusting to an egyptian leader that has to respond to some degree to the wants and desires of his own people. it is a much more high maintenance type of relationship because nothing can be taken for granted in the same way that it was when egypt was essentially a client state. >> president morsi called syria the tragedy of the age. any new ideas there about how to stop the fighting? >> not so much. this is indicative of egypt's position at the moment. more aspirational and ambitious with respect to charting a more independent course, but of course egypt is consumed by domestic affairs, particularly on the economic front. so egypt is not in a position to really exert great influence on the syrian civil war. it is not a proxy player in the sense of supporting any of the sides there, yet it does not have the wherewithal to be a useful facilitator with the iranians in terms of trying to bring about some sort of political settlement or a political framework for dealing with this issue. rhetorically it is a shift, but i don't think egypt is in a position to be a major player with respect to syrian policy. >> how do you think the call for -- how will it go down with the u.s. administration? >> this is a case of people having to reject of him having to address his domestic audience. the u.s. constitution, the u.s. government is not responsible for the actions of individual citizens. president has made it quite clear that while the speech itself is offensive and the president has condemned the content of the speech, this exists within our democratic system here in the united states. president morsi needs to make these comments to assuage the feelings of some citizens back in egypt, but i don't think this will have any material impact on u.s.-egyptian relations. >> the pakistani taliban says they are grant amnesty to a cabinet minister who is offering a $100,000 reward who kills the maker of the anti-islamic film that sparked violent protests across the muslim world. the taliban are reported to have taken the minister of their hit list, saying his views represent the true spirit of islam. up the accord for -- would cover security but is not a comprehensive deal as had been hoped. on the streets of greece, there have been violent clashes between police and demonstrators during a day of strikes. the action was called to protect against massive new cuts in government spending. this report from athens. >> it seems today that this city has come to know all too well, petrol bombs, tear gas, protesters fighting on the streets. this time, the police soon regained control. the kind of violence, the peaceful protest of the majority, marching against more cuts to come. >> we are desperate people. >> the ax will fall on pensions and education and retirement age is set to rise for greece to receive its lifeline. >> it has been over two years since greece requested outside help and things are getting worse. they believe the entire strategy is wrong. imagine what might happen when they come into effect. >> one of those taking part is determined to help those suffering. in his spare time, he runs a clinic offering free care to the new poor of greece. everything here is donated. this is the other side of the crisis, solidarity between greeks hit by austerity. >> it is amazing to see greece in the 21st century having children that are starving. some cannot feed their children are provide simple things like an aspirin. >> at per se, 10 patients a week -- at first, 10 patients came here. now there are a hundred per day. they cannot afford a basic check up for their newborn. we cannot sink any deeper, or else the greek people would die. it is like this country is at war. greece shut down today, but the government is standing firm that without 11.5 billion bureaus of cuts, the country would forbid its long and face bankruptcy. -- would forfeit its loan and face bankruptcy. >> after all, if greece lisa eurozone, i think that will probably mean the end of the eurozone itself. >> beneath the protest, it is easy to forget the human stories of a once confident nation now caught between rage and despair. >> still to come on tonight's program, new babies, young mothers. some are being forcefully torn apart in nigeria. the people of new zealand know only too well about the dangers of earthquakes and the importance of being prepared in an emergency. a large aftershock in christchurch last year killed nearly 200 people. that is why more than a million took part today in what is believed to be the world's first ever nationwide earthquake drill. sirens were sounded alerting people to take cover. our correspondent in the region said this report. >> 9:26, the world's first countrywide earthquake drill began. this is wellington in new zealand where benches a low level walls were used for cover. more than a million people took part, around a third of the total population. >> we want to make sure we keep driving home the drill to do in an emergency. we will follow-up with encouraging businesses and homes to be sure they are prepared at home and at work. >> the exercise was devised following last year's christchurch earthquake that killed 185 people and destroyed dozens of buildings. a report will be produced in november. it zealand television has been running advertisements to alert people to the exercise, telling them how to respond. just before the exercise, a real earthquake struck the north island, but it was small and did no damage. a reminder to the people of this delicate nation. >> adoption rules vary from country to country, but one thing seems to be the norm around the world. the process is neither quick nor easy. people desperate to adopt are sometimes willing to pay for a baby, but that yield underground networks that prey on the poor and vulnerable. our correspondent has been looking into allegations that some nigerian teenagers are being forced to give up their babies. >> motherly love for a newborn son. this 16-year-old came desperate close to losing her child, daniel. it was a traumatic fight to prevent her from being taken away at birth for adoption. she did not tell her parents about her pregnancy. she added to this city, confused, scared, and with no money. she was vulnerable. a refuge for pregnant girls took her in for free. she says it was on the understanding that she would hand over her baby. >> i had nowhere to go. i had to agree that i would give them the baby afterward. >> after her son was born, she wanted to keep him. she told me a worker from the refuge, threaten her with jail if she did not give up her baby. >> she said they would arrest me and jail me. >> her tears are aroused the suspicion of doctors and nurses. hospital officials did not want to comment on this case, but one doctor said that babies are being removed from the hospital even before their babies or discharge. he did agree to speak. he tell me how worried she was when he saw her on the ward. >> she was scared of what would happen to per baby and to her. >> i am on my way to meet the people who run a home where she stayed for many months. i will be putting it to them, are they really run this institution in the best interest of all these vulnerable teenagers? >> set up by the wife of the state governor, they have taken in 100 girls. most have chosen not to keep their babies. it denies this treating many of the girls and said they always have a choice. >> we do counseling. we ask if they still stand by their decision or to go with their baby. >> she is just glad she managed to keep her baby and has been reunited with her now proud grandmother. >> the pain of nigeria's teenage mothers. she is one of the world's most famous children's writers. j.k. rowling has left the magic and the wizardry of harry potter behind to write a novel for adults. has already created a stir because of its extensive use of language that is definitely not suitable for children. she speaks to our editor about what inspired her to write for an older audience. >> j.k. rowling is perhaps the most famous living writer in the world. she is certainly one of the richest. having sold over four hundred 50 million copies of her harry potter books worldwide, now she is opening a new chapter in her literary life with her first novel and that an adult audience. why the change? >> i did not sit down to write this novel. i had nothing to prove. i do not mean that in an arrogant way. i certainly don't mean i think i cannot improve as a writer, but harry potter truly liberated me in the sense that there is only one reason to right now, for me. >> the story is set in a small english town, a community riven with hate and prejudice. >> to have any experience is that you project on to your characters, trying to numb the pain? >> i would not want to go there too much, but i have had my issues. i certainly have mental health issues. i have been depressed. my teenage years, i had issues with anxiety. >> you gave a very moving account of what happened to you. do you think it will change anything? >> i passionately believe in freedom of the press, but having been on the receiving end of some dubious legal behavior, how do we knock this out? i don't know. i hope and pray it does change things because i think it is toxic. >> as a writer, you have created a portfolio of characters which connect with millions, maybe even billions, of people. >> it was murder saying goodbye. if i had a fabulous idea that came out of that world, i would do it. a sidestep, we will see. >> j.k. rowling's latest venture. president ronald reagan once called him a national treasure. singer andy williams was one of the most enduring stars of the 1960's and 1970's. he has died at age 84. ♪ moon river >> he was best known for moon river, the oscar-winning song which featured -- which was featured in the film "breakfast at tiffany's." he died at home in missouri, a year after being diagnosed with cancer. you can find constant updates on our website. from all of us here at world news america, thank you for watching. see you tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. hi, neighbour! you're invited to a tea party at katerina kittycat's house! then we're going to play with o the owl. he has lots of books. this is going to be tiger-tastic. be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ (trolley dings.) - hi, neighbour! we're playing at katerina kittycat's house today. - hello, daniel tiger, meow, meow. hi, neighbour.
PBS
Sep 24, 2012 5:30pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." reporting from washington, i am laura trevelyan. the death toll rises in syria, with funerals on both sides. the man brought in to end the violence gives a bleak assessment. >> the situation in syria is extremely bad and getting worse. >> closing another chapter in one of china's biggest political scandals. the policeman at the center of a cover-up is sentenced to 15 years in jail. and starting out the streets of new york. meet the man who marries the movie makers with those stunning shots of the big apple. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. extremely bad and getting worse -- that is how lakhdar brahimi, the new international envoy to syria, described the situation after a briefing to the un security council. the president still has his supporters. our chief international correspondent has gained rare access to the government's side. she filed this report from the village. >> this woman is burying her husband today. "the light of my eyes is gone," she wails. her husband was in the army. so was her brother. she buried him not long ago. this 26-year-old died when his helicopter crashed. the military has brought his coffin home. the entire village turns out. men fired guns. the women through rice -- threw rice. it is the 17th time this village has lost one of its own. in this area, not a day goes by without a funeral. this is the heartland of president assad and his community. there is space to mourn his troops. the syrians who die at their hands do not get that chance. this lieutenant makes his final journey up the steps of his family home. his mother waits. in this war, grief is not just personal. he is not her son, nor mine. his mother is syria, his aunt tells me. as grief wells up, so does anger. "we are good muslims," she shouts. "those who slaughter violate every religion." for many here, this war threatens their very identity. that is why members of this minority sect are ready to defend it and their president with their lives. >> another young man buried him, another soldier dead -- buried, another soldier dead. in villages like this, their support for their president, bashar al-assad, and syria, has not died. >> their are two sides. -- there are two sides. we do not like the conflict. we do not want it. but we do what we are compelled to do. >> syrians are dying everyday. many more on the other side. everyone says they want peace. with each new grade, it seems further away -- new grave, it seems further away. the next starts in just an hour -- the next funeral starts in just an hour. >> for more on the tug of war which is ripping syria a part, i spoke with the author of the new book "syria -- the fall of the house of assad." you have met the president. how did the man that you hoped would be a reformer become so aggressive? -- oppressive? >> they become so comfortable with power. they start to believe the sycophants around them. that the cell -- that the well- being of the country is synonymous with their well- being. it becomes an alternate reality to the point where he believes what he is doing now is actually saving the country. >> in your book, you describe him as being quite unassuming. you say he likes western rock music. what was he like in person? >> at first, he was very unassuming on pretentious, even self-deprecating -- unassuming, unpretentious, even self- deprecating. what i saw over time was this sense of triumphalism. all of that has informed his response, in terms of cracking down on the uprising. >> knowing him as you do, do you think he is determined to fight it out to the bitter and bloody and -- end? >> i think so. he believes he is saving the country, he and his supporters. they believe they can win this. they are in this for the long haul. this is not going to be over in one year, two years, three years down the road. >> we saw the report that there is still a lot of loyalty to president assad. how deep is that loyalty? >> it is very deep among some communities, particularly the second -- sect to which assad belongs. including sumy's who have been coopted by the regime over the unnis -- including s who have been coopted by the regime over the years. whoever wins over the silent majority will eventually win this civil war. >> do you think president assad would ever take refuge in another country if things got too bad? >> only if there is no other choice. i really believe that he and his supporters, especially his in the circle -- his inner circle, will sink or swim together. >> fascinatingly, you reveal how president assad was actually an accidental president. it was meant to be his brother. >> absolutely. he was not groomed to be his brother, which is why we thought he might be different from someone in whom we had high hopes could reform the system -- might be different, someone in whom we had high hopes could reform the system. unfortunately, rather than him changing the authoritarian system, as many hoped, the system changed him. >> how do you see this ending? >> i see a protracted stalemate, and what i call the 11 -- the lebanonization of the country. >> thank you for joining us. now to afghanistan. in the aftermath of a brazen attack on one of the main nato bases in the country, the taliban released a video that they shake -- say shows preparations for the assault on camp bastion. the bbc has sent this special report from camp bastion. >> the parade of u.s. marines, a replacement for aircraft destroyed by the taliban -- these handover can bastion -- these hang over camp bastion, the scene of a fierce battle. there was no moonlight. it was pitch black. they quickly moved to where the carriers were, firing rocket- propelled grenades. in a short space of time, it is triceps -- they destroyed several carrier -- harrier jets. the taliban video shows the insurgents in training. the attackers were wearing similar american army uniforms. their tactics have the hallmarks of the haqqani network. the pakistani-based group linked to the taliban. this is the aftermath of the attack, filmed again by the insurgents. flames and smoke hundreds of feet high could be seen for miles. british fire fighters crossed the runway. they described the scene as chaos. >> we saw a green tracer. we heard small arms fire from a distance. we realized that the situation was more serious. >> gunners from the royal air force for the first on the scene to support the marines. this sergeant was wounded by shrapnel. >> it is quite well defended. they managed to exploit it. they were dealt with quickly. >> two of the heavily-armored vehicles were disabled in the firefight. attack helicopters were called in. these are from prince harry's squadron. the prince was taken to a secure location. the marines have started to replace the lost aircraft. while defending the here years that might, the squadron commander lt. colonel was -- the harrier, a squadron commander lt. colonel was killed. this attack, on one of the largest camps in afghanistan, was unthinkable. the tactics the taliban used are hardly new. the damage to camp sebastien and its reputation have been enormous -- camp bastion and its reputation have been enormous. among the european court has ruled that abu hamza -- >> the european court has ruled that abu hamza can be extradited to the united states. in america, abu hamza is accused of planning at terrorist training camp in oregon and assisting hostage-taking. the former israeli prime minister ehud olmert has received a fine and a suspended sentence and the corruption case -- in the corruption case. roman catholics in germany who have opted out of paying the country's religious tax will not be denied holy communion -- will now be denied holy communion and religious burial. this brings the church about $6.5 billion per year. china has moved a step closer towards drawn a line under its biggest political scandal in decades -- drawing a line under its biggest political scandal in decades. we told you about the crime committed by the wife of bo xilai. one of the most powerful figures in the country was jailed today for 15 years. now officials can deal with bo xilai himself, who was once destined for a leadership role in the party. >> in just a few weeks, china will unveil a new leadership. the men who will govern 1/fifth -- 1/5 of humanity. it was plunged into uncertainty by this man. in court today, anng -- wang lijun was full of contrition. scared the death penalty, he apologized. -- spared the death penalty, he apologized. he revealed that neil heywood had been murdered by the wife of one of china's most powerful politicians. she has since been convicted. now her husband, bo xilai, could be the next to fall. he was one of the communist party's most charismatic man. he was detained -- he has been detained at a secret location since the scandal broke. he still has many supporters. his website has been shut down. he says china's other leaders feared bo because he was different. >> bo xilai was so popular amongst the ordinary people. he wants to narrow the gap between the rich and the poor. they want to get rid of him. >> china's leaders pride themselves on their discipline and unity. the scandal surrounding bo xilai has left them looking divided ahead of their most important political event in a decade. the communist party likes to stage manage and control everything. much is still uncertain. we do not know if bo xilai will still face trial for obstructing investigation into neil heywood's death. the leadership exchange could be just a couple of weeks away. >> in more news from china today, the taiwanese technology giant foxconn has halted production at its plant after a fight broke out among its workers. it supplies giants -- tech giants including apple, h-p, and microsoft. the bbc has more on this recent outburst. >> according to foxconn, the fight broke in the private dormitory housing some of its workers. it then escalated and involved 2000 workers. according to the state-run news agency, up to 5000 police -- that is 5000 -- were drafted in to get the situation under control. foxconn is stressing that this incident does not appear to be related. there are suggestions that this mass brawl was triggered after one of the workers was hit by a security guard. foxconn is one of the major suppliers for some of the world's biggest electronics companies, including apple. it has been under the spot before. there have been allegations about poor working conditions and poor pay. there have also been a spate of suicides in some plants in recent years. >> you are watching "bbc world news america." still to come, global health officials are monitoring the new virus related to sars. we will ask a top doctor what the public needs to know. the daughter of south korea's former military strongman has apologized for the human rights violations committed during his rule. she is part in running for president in south korea's december election. this report -- she is currently running for president in south korea's december election. this report does contain some flash photography. >> just weeks into her nomination, south korea's first credible female nominee is apologizing not for herself, but for her dad. >> i think incidents in the past damaged constitutional values and laid the political development of korea. i sincerely apologize -- and delayed the political development of korea. i sincerely apologize once again. >> her father was not just anyone. he was perhaps south korea's best known president. he was a military leader who took power and is credited with extorting the country's miracle of economic growth and with trembling -- with quick starting -- with kickstarting the country's miracle of economic growth and with trembling the human rights of the people -- trampleing the human rights of the people. >> people are well aware of how difficult it is for koreans to judge their parents and point out their errors. as long as i am standing as the country's presidential candidate, i should be objective and empathize with people. >> park geun-hye has been battling her father's image since the beginning of her campaign. the question is whether this apology will lay that history to rest. bbc news, seoul. >> tonight, a man is being treated in a london hospital for a new and potentially fatal virus similar to sars. sars killed hundreds of people in asia. the patient from qatar apparently contracted the infection in the middle east. so far, there are only two confirmed cases. it does not appear to be very contagious. i am joined by a doctor from nashville, tennessee, the chair of vendor built university's preventative medicine department -- vanderbilt university's preventive medicine department. how significant do you think the detection of this related virus is? >> it is important. it is a new virus. a is capable of producing very serious illness. at the moment, it does not seem to be highly transmissible. it is so new that we really have to keep our eye on it. but you say that the virus does not -- >> you said that the virus does not appear to be transmitted very quickly, but how does it spread? >> it can be spread person to person through very close contact. sars spread to health care workers very readily. fortunately, that has not yet happened in this circumstance. perhaps we can take a deep breath and not be too concerned. those of us who care for patients, if we have patients from that part of the world, the middle east, we will put them quickly into respiratory isolation until we can clear them and make sure they do not have this infection. >> when you talk about keeping an eye on this virus, what do you mean exactly? >> i mean that both in the carter and saudi arabia -- in qatar and saudi arabia, they ought to be looking for other patients with this illness and identify it. if patients come from that part of the world, we need to isolate them and then see if we can isolate the virus and learn more about the behavior of this virus. it is brand new. we have to watch it very carefully. >> i'm always telling my children to wash their hands. are those the kinds of precautions that should be taken? >> of course, washing hands. if they are admitted to the hospital and they are very ill, there would be put in strict respiratory isolation -- they would be put in strict respiratory isolation. people would be wearing face masks and other protective gear to be sure that we do not pick it up from them. >> sars spread around is a rapidly and killed 10% of those who were infected. could this virus potentially be as deadly? >> this virus is apparently of that same family, but a distinct from sars, so we know very little about it at the present time. no, one of the mysteries about sars is why did it suddenly stop. we do not really know about that. all of a sudden, new cases did not occur, fortunately. >> how prepared would america's front-line hospitals be to deal with the viral outbreak? >> i think quite. we are all using these kinds of protective gear all the time. we have been using them since the pandemic of influenza, so we know how to use them. there are plenty of respirators available for us to use and our personnel are trained. we would be ready to cope with this problem should it occur. >> thank you. in the u.s., the emmys celebrated television's finest. "homeland" was the big winner, picking up four coveted awards. have you ever stop to think about where your favorite movies and tv shows are actually filmed? in new york, it is the job of nick carr to scour the city and find the perfect locations. he gave us this first-person account. some of the locations you might recognize. others could be coming to a theater knew you -- near you soon. and itnew it from movies lik seemed like this crazy, amazing place. my name is nick carr. i am a movie location scout. i do away -- a blog called "scouting new york." this is a great building. it looks like a little gap. nothing stands out. but this is one of the coolest things i have ever stumbled across in new york. as you walk closer, you will see it is not just a random alleyway with trash barrels or something like that. it opens up into this beautiful courtyard with these gorgeous houses, all of which were built three civil war. it is the last thing you'd expect to stumble on it -- build pre-civil war -- which were built pre-civil war. it is the last thing you would expect to stumble on here. this is the apartment building was used for the tv show "friends." one of the most cliche locations that i get asked to stop for is the dank, dilapidated, new york city alley. people are always going down them and going -- and getting murdered or killed, but the truth is that manhattan has very few alleys. we are here at one of my favorite streets -- on one of my favorite street in all of manhattan. it has a curve to it. most of the streets have agreed formation. turning down the street like this -- have a grid formation. turning down the street, curved like this, makes it a special place. this is one of my favorite things i have stumbled across in new york. i was walking on the street one day. i turned on to this block. there is this massive mentioned that looks like it could be something out of long island hospital coast. it has huge gates. this mysterious mention -- long island's gold coast. it has huge gates. this mysterious mentioned. it is the last thing you'd expect to find here. people always ask me what is your favorite place in new york city. my stock answer -- it is true -- it is the place i have not been. >> nick carr on scouting out the best locations in new york city. i'm laura trevelyan. thank you for watching. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Sep 11, 2012 4:00pm PDT
>> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. i'm kathy kaye. china's premier insist that country's economy is still healthy, but what about the health of the man set to lead the nation? he has gone missing. anstrom in the diplomatic compound in cairo in anger over a movie they say is anti- islamic. and victory at the u.s. open. those at home are inspired. the crux of was proud of him winning. -- >> i was proud of them winning. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also of around the globe how do you plan a political transition in the world's most populous transition if the future leaders simply goes missing? that is what happened in china out where he has failed to show up for a string of key meetings. this political mystery only adds to china's economic uncertainty. today, the current premier wen jiabao out said the chinese economy is still strong. members tell a different story. -- the numbers tell a different story. >> today, taking his final bout before business bosses around the world. soon, went about will make way for a new generation of communist leaders. will make way for a new generation of communist leaders. >> the chinese ship will sail fast and steadily and reached the shore of a brighter future. >> in the past decade, china's economy grew more than 10% per year. and over 100 million jobs were created. and in the past three years, more than a thousand miles of railways were completed along with 200,000 miles of roads. china's communist leaders rely on delivering fast growth for their legitimacy. their economy, like others in the world, is slowing fast. all economies, fast and emerging, are experiencing an economic slowdown. today, china's production lines employ 200 million workers. consumers in the west are not buying. some are seeing sales to europe cut in half and a year. >> and now you have almost no profit. >> are you losing money now? >> last year, the first year we lose money. >> and the discord extends to china's new middle class's, too. they have money, much unaffordable. in the boom years, prices were rising fast, especially housing. >> the government needs to keep a lid on inflation. if prices stay high, then people will be more and more dissatisfied. >> china's next leaders will face an uncomfortable time. the next leader is expected to take over the communist party, but has not been seen in public for days. had he fallen victim to political insiders or just injured his back? >> they are now preparing to step aside just at a time that they have been buffeted by rumors of scandal. china's incredible growth story may be running out of speed. >> for more on the growing interest and the next leader's whereabouts, i spoke with the former china analyst at the cia, chris johnson, who is out now at the center for strategic and international studies. the next leader has not been seen since september 1 and has canceled meetings with the least four foreign dignitaries. >> that is right. he has not been able physically to make a public appearance. with the transition they are facing and the swirling going on about his location status at this point, if he were physically able to be out there and see in public, i think he would be. whatever is going on, it is a health the situation keeping him from appearing, or it is political. that is worse case scenario. >> at what point to the chinese have no choice but to show him in public? there are 250 million bloggers in china who are focused on his whereabouts. >> that is right and this is the problem for the regime right now. the secrecy of their politics does not translate to the internet base society they live in. bloggers and others simply speculate and usually in a direction that the leadership is not comfortable with. they say that the leadership is divided and that there is political in citing. they either need to have him appear in the coming days or have a statement about what is going on. >> there are reports that he canceled a meeting with secretary of state hillary clinton because of a bad back. is that what you think is going on, or something more sinister? >> i do not know about sinister, but you would think that it would be able to get him together to make an appearance. he was supposed to and make another appearance on monday. the media was invited to show up and then they canceled it. it sounds like more than a bad back to me. >> the chinese must be thinking at this point, can't anything go right with this transition? because they are also dealing with other things coming out of the scandal of socialite, of course, after sending his wife to prison. this is a time when the world is watching carefully what happens in china. >> the global economy is much more interested in this story than it has been in the past. pressure is very high on the leadership. the scandals are all tied together. the party that is really has not decided what they plan to do with the bo-shi lai case. >> more than one quarter million people have fled the violence in syria and the u.n. now says this is the world's worst refugee crisis. 100,000 people have left a note last month alone. many are headed for jordan. that is where our correspondent that one family bearing the scars of the fighting. >> there are a close-knit family from hommes and they are crammed in a hotel room. mealtime, as with young children anywhere, is a battle of wills. they fled here after viewed -- leaving everything that they had, everything but their lives. there are statistics of the untold suffering emerging from syria every day. they were fast asleep when a shell hit their home. it started a fire, which quickly engulfed the children. >> they were burning. i heard them crying. i ran after them to try to take their clothing off. i tried to put the fire out. i did not feel the pain. i did not feel a fire on my hands. and i thank god we manage to save them. >> when you remember that day and what it did to your family, what do you think of? >> it is a very hard feelings i feel for myself and my children. we got hit and know the pain. i feel for every syrian child and every syrian person. >> this 6-year-old managed to escape the flames, but his 3- year-old sister could not. this 4-year-old has third degree burns all over her body. >> once she looked at herself in a mirror and said, i am burned. i used to be beautiful. i told her, you are still beautiful. >> the children's personalities have changed. once outgoing unsociable, the parents now keep them inside to protect them from stairs. -- stares. today, this one's left hand is being operated on. a traumatic experience for a small child. and it is not her first operation. doctors are removing deep scar tissue on our hands of that she can read -- can use it properly. they have operated on thousands caught in the conflict in the middle east. the surgery is complicated. her face will have to wait a couple of years to be more likely to succeed. >> her mother said that she knows the doctors can occur as beautiful as before, and even maybe more beautiful. >> of course, she is a sad mother. but i can assure her that she will be near normal. >> another operation ahead for her, many more leithead. this is the damage done by a single shell to this family. >> the innocent victims of syria oppose the ongoing violence. militias in liberty -- in libya have stormed ben ghazi, that country's second-largest city. reports say that they were protecting an american film that allegedly humiliates the prophet muhammed. protesters in egypt during the american flag outside the u.s. embassy in cairo. they, too, were protesting the fell. they say it abuses the right of free speech and hurts the religious beliefs of others. today in the united states and many places around the world, people stopped to mark the of the 11th anniversary of the september 11 attacks in which nearly 3000 were killed. the president led a moment of silence this morning and then traveled to the pentagon for a ceremony there. in new york, people gathered at the memorial's where twin towers once stood. more than a decade later, where does the greatest threat remained? i spoke with a senior fellow at the center for american progress. before i get to where we are 11 years on, here we are at the council of in ben ghazi in libya, a country that americans helped to liberate from colonel gaddafi, being stormed. it is an indication, is in it, of how strong muslim feelings are around the world and that they can turn against the u.s.? >> yes, and is similar to what we have seen in the -- in afghanistan over the last few years when we have seen the koran being destroyed. or other things like this pastor with inflating opinions. even when we use our military might, we do not necessarily win friends and influence people if we are not sensitive to these concerns about their faith. >> and arguably in afghanistan where american forces are still after 11 years. you think americans thought 11 years ago that their troops would still be in that country? >> not at all. this is the longest war in our history. most americans are quite surprised we are still there. i think we had this phase in the first six or seven years after 9/11 where we used military might to enforce in a lot of these places and it simply did not work. it did not make american save and it did not make countries like iraq and afghanistan substantially save for themselves. i think we have seen a change in strategy with a much more targeted approach toward eradicating the al qaeda network. and now we are really refocusing on how to return to american power, with our economy and other things. the time for crusades and the like are long past. >> there was a protest in yemen just yesterday. but we had a -- we had in al qaeda untifigure killed there. sentiment can easily turn against america, what of the strategy, whether it is put on the ground or drones in the air. >> there is concern that the use of smart power is quite an developed in the u.s. we can go in with our military is, whether targeted strikes or large numbers of boots on the ground, and have some sort of impact. but what we are still not very good at is the diplomacy, and the cultural diplomacy and economic diplomacy as well we did that during the cold war time frame, but we have not done that well in the muslim world. >> the family of the young christian girl accused of blasphemy in pakistan have said that neighbors threatened to burn them alive. the girl was released on bail on saturday, but could still face charges. her parents claim she is innocent and they fear for their lives in pakistan. here's a report from islamabad. >> out of jail, but not out of danger. she was whisked away on saturday to an undisclosed location under tight security. in an uncertain future. we manage to meet her family to hear about their ordeal. for their safety, we are concealing their faces. they told us that their daughter is a shy 11-year-old who is illiterate and has always been slow. they said she was sitting quietly at home when a crowd gathered outside, claiming that she had burned pages from an islamic nexpo. her mother tried to hold off the mob. >> a woman hit me and slapped my face. a lot of people had gathered. they all started running into the house to catch my doctor -- catch my daughter. i was scared they might kill us. we were all crying. my daughter was very upset. >> this is the poor districts at the edge of the capital where they lived. and this is where the father said their neighbors threaten to send double life. >> they were claiming they were going to burn us inside the house. we are not going to scare you or your kids. then we will burn the homes of the other christians. -- we are not going to spare you or your kids. that will burn the homes of the other christians. >> there were locked in their rooms. >> there were saying they were going to cut off the hands of the person that burned the koran. later the police took her away. >> the government has promised to protect the family, but past history makes them fearful. >> we are aware that we can be attacked and killed any time. in cases before, people were accused and killed. >> they claim she did not burn any islamic texts, and that they have none in their home. but they worry that the blasphemy allegations will shadowed them everywhere they go. >> a family anxious to escape. still to come, did the u.s. help cover of a soviet massacre of more than 20,000 polish troops? we bring you the shocking new evidence being uncovered. the duke and duchess of cambridge have arrived in singapore for the start of a nine-day tour of the far east and south pacific. it is part of the queen's diamond jubilee. they stopped at singapore's botanic gardens today. >> he looks increasingly at home in the role that will dominate the rest of his life. she looks, well, as she has always looked ever since she joined the royal family, composed and confident. for william and kate, is the start of their second overseas tour together. it is a smooth double act that looks the part and finds the right words. this was william at a speech in singapore. >> for catherine and me, this year will also be special for the privilege of making this trip on behalf of her majesty, the queen. >> the couple's first engagement in singapore was a poignant one. they had gone to the botanic gardens to see an orchid that was named in honor of williams' mother, diana. she never saw it, he said, did she? she was killed two weeks before scheduled trip to singapore. a moment of silence. and then another orchid to mark the couple's visits. it looks like royal tourism, and to a certain extent is. the orchids had been done in little more than 10 minutes. but alongside the superfast sightseeing, there is a purpose to royal tours such as this. over the next eight days, william and kate will promote british interests and the issues that matter to them personally. all the while, of course, under intense international scrutiny of what she is wearing, how she is looking to buy and how well they operate as a team. -- how she is looking, and how well they operate as a team. >> did the american government cover-up soviet atrocities during the second world war? that is the suggestion made in newly released documents. in 1940, 22,000 polish officers were massacred in russia's forest. for decades, the soviet blamed the nazis for the deaths, only admitting to the atrocity in 1990. new evidence shows america helped hide their actions in order to remain allies against hitler. >> german troops had invaded the soviet union and uncovered the massacre in 1943. finding the bodies of thousands of polish officers and other prisoners shot by the soviet secret police. the germans brought american prisoners of war here so they could see the massacre that had taken place years before the nazi invasion. this photograph was taken by one of the american soldiers, would then send secret messages to u.s. military intelligence saying the soviet union was to blame for the killings. the son of a polish army officer executed here, said the evidence was clear. >> the bodies and the ground -- on the ground war from 1940. you could tell by the composition of the bodies. the russians did it. nobody else could have done it. >> but now has become clear that evidence was deliberately suppressed by the u.s. government and president roosevelt. according to experts who reviewed the newly released documents, they showed that washington chose to ignore the secret messages sent from their 1943 by the american soldiers. >> the u.s. army officers allowed the u.s. army and government to know in the summer of 1943 what had actually happened. it is a devastating act, but because there were concerns there was a deceitful program in place from the start. >> despite the horror, it seems the united states had the side of the soviet union was too important as a wartime ally to start blaming it for the massacre. the truth was only revealed in 1990. bbc news. >> he did it, at last. that is what they are thinking in scotland after andy murray won his first grand slam tennis title. today, he reveled in the victory in new york, showing off his hard-earned prize. back in his home town in scotland, thousands of fans celebrated after staying up all night to watch the match. >> trepidation and little sleep for those who stayed up to watch andy murray triumph. >> [indiscernible] >> this is a win for scotland. >> this was a long time coming. >> his hometown as much -- normally a much quieter town. andy murray spent his childhood here. his family remained. they are all close and they know how much a grand slam success will mean. >> i think the monkey is off his back now. hopefully, he will not be known as the best player that never produced a grand slam. >> there are already landmarks marking his medals. now there is a plan in the works to mark his latest win. >> he basically said, get off the court. you are rubbish. he must have been maybe 10 or 11 at the time. >> and now there are plenty of young players on the courts that andy murray has inspired. >> i love the game. i was proud of him winning. >> many are hoping for a visit home from their hero, so they can tell him how proud they are of his success and of his grand slam win. >> how cute is that little boy? they love andy murray there. and oliver great britain as well. that brings up -- and all over great britain as well. that brings us to the end of the show for all of us here at world news america, thanks for watching. i will see you back here tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. guess what, neighbour? today we're going to visit... mr. mcfeely's post office! and then we're going to... baker aker's bakery! i'm so excited to spend the day with you. and i'll be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neig
PBS
Sep 10, 2012 5:30pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc world news america." america and pans over and have down prison but not the prisoners. hundreds of suspected terrorists are still under u.s. control. >> america may be reluctant to hand over senior taliban commanders, they are the very key who may hold it -- group that may hold the key to lasting peace. >> kofi annan tell us why he took on the daunting role of the u.n. on void assyria. >> i did my best. >> keeping score in fenway park. carrying on a baseball tradition for 20 years. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the world. tomorrow marks the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks which changed america and led to the invasion of afghanistan. more than a decade later, the notorious bagram prison which holds thousands of taliban prisoners and foreign suspects was handed over. the prisoners are still under american control. we report now from kabul. >> this was supposed to mark a moment of national pride and a marker on the road to afghans sovereignty. the official handover of bagram prison. while it hundreds have been transferred, hundreds more remain in the hands of u.s. military. >> we want to show the international community that human rights will be observed. i trust that they will do their job as best that they can there will be no problem with that. >> it has a troubled history, labeled by some as at the afghanistan guantanamo with serious allegations of prisoner abuse. now, renamed and rebuilt, it still house is what america calls hyatt value detainee's. -- high value detainees. the prison transfers still a sign that they're going to have to take control of their own country. most native troops prepare to leave. america may be reluctant to hand over senior taliban commanders, there the very group may hold the key to any lasting peace. the talent and still has not been defeated even after more than 10 years of fighting -- the calibans still has not been defeated. they still carry out complex attacks. one think tank says moderate figures now want to negotiate peace. >> they are prepared to break with al qaeda. they're fully prepared to except a long-term u.s. military presence. that is simply the reality they understand. >> they are a desperate group. they say they see no sign of their leadership wanting to negotiate. he says, in my opinion, this report is not correct that the taliban wants to talk with the americans. they want all foreigners to leave the country. the raising of the afghan flag over the prison is as an american move as they will soon depart. in 28 months, all combat troops will have left and there is little time left to strike a deal with the telegram. bbc news, kabul. >> for more, i spoke with the author of "little america: the war within the war." they made a big show of raising the flag. if you do not hand over hundreds of the inmates, this is just a hand over in name only. >> it's an effort by the americans to show they can their commitment to have a hand over, but look. with thousands of u.s. and nato forces still in the country, the defacto part it -- power is still with the coalition. what's more important is that hundreds of recently rounded up suspected insurgents are in the hands of the united states. there is still a fundamental dispute between u.s. commanders and the afghan government over what sort of process the afghans will use to continue to detain inmates and how they're going to try to adjudicate the release of some of them. afghanistan does not have on its books any sort of laws to indefinitely detained people for security violations. will they seek to put some of them on trial and release others? >> it is symptomatic of the real breakdown in trust between washington and the afghan authorities in the run-up to this handover. >> what is particularly striking about today's event is that senior nato commanders did not show up. general allan, the american and passenger, none of them were there. it was left to a junior ranking officer to take the american position on the dais. >> at the same time, we have these reports coming now of one london-based group that the taliban are interested in negotiating and it was quickly denied. what do you read in the political side of this? >> president karzai wants to have the leverage to be able to let some of these individuals go, to catalyze potential negotiations. he sees these inmates as a key bargaining chip, a way to build trust and confidence, and to do a deal on his own terms and not have the united states and other players essentially dictating terms for him. >> is a coherent enough group that you can actually say that you will negotiate with senior talent and leadership in order to have some transition? >> there are factions that karzai thinks he can work with. there is no grand deal to be had. it is debatable whether senior taliban leaders really want to do a deal right now or whether they think they can just hold on for a few more years until the americans and their nato allies are largely out of afghanistan. in which case, they can continue their campaign to take over the country. >> do you have a reading on whether there is a political transition to be had? >> the odds are very slim that we will see any kind of meaningful peace deal in the next few years. it will happen after 2014, after conventional nato forces are out of the country. >> thank you for coming in. as u.s. forces continue to hold terrorist suspects, there are reports from american officials that an all qaeda leader once detained has been killed in yemen. said al-shihri is described as the second in command of al qaeda in the arabian peninsula. our security correspondent frank gardner has more. >> killed in an air strike. it the second most senior member of al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, a group washington considers the most dangerous branch about qaeda anywhere in the world. they say he was killed by a u.s. unmanned drone. yemen resents the program of drone strikes. they are angry at their government. when a drunk killed a popular cleric, they called it out of control. it is proving hard to eliminate altogether. the loss of the senior leader will be mourned by militants. it is this man, the master bomb maker, that america fears the most. he is still at large. frank gardner, bbc news. >> there will be no miracle. that was the warning today from the new u.n. envoy to syria. he was speaking in cairo with the head of the arab league. he has only been in the job for a week but it is a sober check. when kofi annan left, he said it was almost an impossible mission. i sat down with the former u.n. secretary general for c-span. on fed uri 23rd, he became the united nations envoy charged with trying to stop the violence in syria. it was a mission many called impossible. why did he take it? >> it could explode beyond its borders and really create problems for everybody. i felt i had to try. i gave it a shot. i did my best. >> his best was not enough. the killing only increased. the 27 weeks later, he gave up. >> do you worry that the peace plan and gave al assaad to say he was in the process of negotiating but actually just moving forward? >> it is what some people say, but i believe that the elements of the six-point plan will have to be implemented sooner or later. i know the argument. people say you have many people, even today, who are not interested in any negotiations, and a diplomatic efforts. they see the only solution as a military one. >> as a statesman, he warns that farming the rebel -- arming the rebels is no quick fix. >> the problem is not one individual assaad. even if he were to leave today, we have massive problems to deal with still in syria. >> there are clear parallels between syria and iraq. the biggest crisis of his time during the secretary general. he opposed the military occupation and his outspoken in his criticism for president bush's push for force. >> they were so determined to take action that i'm not sure they were ready to listen. when you're in that situation, you do make mistakes. you provoke others. >> he says the echoes of the war are with us all today, even in syria. >> the war in iraq exercised to the jihadists who rushed to fight. we are likely to see the same in syria if we do not handle it properly. >> that was last week for the c- span program, "after words peak of the most high-profile defector has described how they helped him escape his home land. french services helped him escape, but he refused to reveal more the details in the fear he could endanger people's lives. his defection was seen as a major blow to the damascus government. he is being touted as a potential figurehead for the opposition. members of the new parliament have elected and academic ending two decades of political transition. he is seen as a moderate and the unexpectedly defeated the former president. the united nations describes the vote as a milestone for somalia. at least 38 people including seven police officers have been killed in ethnic clashes in the canyon coastal region. the kenyan government has now imposed a curfew in the county and they have sent in extra security forces. it is a murder case grabbing international headlines. today, police in france reveal a single semi-automatic weapon was killed -- was used to kill a french family suggesting a single gunman was responsible for the death of the family. they search their home in surrey, but no dangerous material was found. >> for its third day, searches have continued at the house and the investigation here in surrey is still led by french authorities. there has been a dramatic turn of events. the media was moved back 100- meters around the house. then was the arrival of the bomb disposal team. sorry police said the team had been brought in because of concerns about items found up to outbuildings in the garden. as a precaution, a small number people inside, including this builder working on a neighboring property, were forced to leave. >> they told the lady of the house we all had to evacuate. >> they have turned up items that were non hazardous. residents were allowed back. there is no indication from the french authorities about whether this is helping to move the inquiry on orbit starting any new lines of inquiry. they say the work is continuing for several days. in france, it's reported that only one gun was used to kill saad al-hilli. it is reported that french police have now spoken briefly to zainab al-hilli who has been brought out of the medically- induced coma. officers will have to wait to speak to her. they're using power tools to access a safe. in the garden, a tent is being put up to protect the material being moved from the outbuildings. >> you are watching "bbc world news america of." the madagascar cocoa crop is one of the finest in the world and now teams are trying to cash in by stealing. quite south african mining sector in turmoil again after 15,000 miners downed their tools and west of johannesburg. on rest continues at the americana platinum mines where 34 workers were shot dead by police. ♪ >> another day has gone by with no end to negotiations. armed with six machetes, thousands of the mine workers intensifying their protest action by marking -- marching demanding they been shut down until the approved salary is met. these mineworkers are angry. they're coming here to confront their colleagues. they are angry because of a peace accord that was signed last friday. they say the peace accord will not guarantee them better wages. the strike is now entering its fifth week and taking a more militant town. >> those who are doing this to they are putting their lives at risk. we all want money. they are setting us back. >> police are overwhelmed and out numbers letting the minors push through the gates. they continue to monitor to make sure no workers will be heard. the platinum producer linemen said he helped employees would return back to work after the signing of the police accord. many believe the union failed them in negotiations and they are going at it alone. bbc news london. >> when you think of chocolate, i'm willing to think that bandits are not the first thing that come to mind. on the island of madagascar are, the villages to cultivate some of the richest cocoa beans in the world are struggling against the scourge of midnight thieves. >> the far northwestern region of madagascar. hear, the tropical climate and rich soil gives farmers an abundance of some of the finest cocoa in the world. plucked from the trees, they produce highly valuable beans sought after by leading chocolatiers around the world. fetching a hefty price, cocoa provides a much-needed and come for entire communities on the silent. these beans have become the target of roofless cocoa bandits. -- ruthless bandits. this 62-year-old man surveys the broken doors. the pods they have collected over weeks have been stolen. armed men snuck in from the forest and it took the whole stock. and threatened other villages and have even taken pods street from the trees. they're now considering buying a gun in order to protect the villages livelihood. some farmers are now so fearful they have resulted to hiding the beans in their homes. madagascar produces about 500- 600 tons of cacao oever year. one ton is worth $6,000. that is a hefty cash crop for any would be thieves. madagascar are provides a great protection for bonilla. their movement is strictly regulated. --- the provided protection for vanilla. >> the quality is quite nice. are you happy with how it comes out? thatey say it's vital cocoa is better protected otherwise the industry will suffer and farmers will struggle to meet demand. >> it's up to the government to take steps to really prevent the theft of cacao. it is a loss for not only the farmer but for us because we are reliant on these beans to produce high-quality chocolate. >> madagascar are is not an industrialized nation. they rely on what the islands farmers produce. the celebrated cocoa bean could become a about -- as valuable as gold. bbc news, madagascar. >> now to one of america's most famous sporting venues, faint -- fenway park. fans have been marking its 100th birthday. technology has affected many parts of the game, but at fenway the scoreboard is still changed by hand. for the past 22 years, that job has fallen to a christian who works inside the sev37-foot wall known as the green monster. here's his personal account. >> it has been a great experience. a wild ride. i have been doing this more than half my life. it has become such a big part of me. a lot of people who live around here and in the new england area, their parents brought them to fenway. their parents brought their parents. it's a generation to generation tradition passed down. the scoreboard is part and parcel of that. it's a long standing tradition of the major league players coming back here, signing their name, checking out the scoreboard. a lot of times when people come back here, i feel like a museum curator pointing out the names and talking about the different things that have happened back here. originally, i just wanted to be on the grounds crew for one summer but there was not any openings. with a little bit of luck, timing, and who you know i was offered this position. i said, all right, i will do it for one summer. here we are 22 years later. really, we are in charge of keeping track of the red sox scores. new york, 5-4. we also keep the fans up-to-date on scores for all of the other ball games in the major leagues going on at the same time. we now keep track of the national league scores. when i first guarded, we did not do that. we cannot access the national league scores from inside. one of us runs outside and we change the numbers between innings. that has been a change since i started. there is no bathroom. there are no fans. to be honest, we don't want any of that stuff. i think that's part of the mystique, the aura, the tradition of the hallowed ground back here. to be a part of it is something i consider myself a very, very lucky. ♪ at the old ball game ♪ [cheers and applause] >> clinging to a tradition. keeping score at fenway park. that brings the show to a close. if you can get updates on any of these stories on our website at any time. for all of us here, thanks for watching. i will see you tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Sep 20, 2012 5:30pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> if this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. the former russian spy was poisoned to death and london. six years later, a british judge will like to know why. the protests over the anti islamic film spreads to pakistan where crowds tried to storm the american embassy. china is aging fast. could these pensioners be the stumbling block to the country's economic growth? >> this looming population crisis, the costs that might bring might be what will way the chinese economy down. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. a british judge has opened an inquest to discover whether moscow ordered the killing of the former russian spy who died in a london hospital six years ago from a massive dose of radioactive polonium. just before he got sick he had tea with two other russians in a london cafe. now, the court like to know why he was killed. >> alexander litvinenko was poisoned by radiation. he was a fierce critic of the kremlin. where they behind his death? a lawyer for his widow said it was vital to establish whether this was a targeted assassination by agents of a foreign state. this would be an active state- sponsored nuclear terrorism on the streets of london. do you believe that the russian state was behind the murder? >> . now, i believe it. they say that polonium was used at such a high level of radioactive material. you cannot find it anywhere because it is all under state control. >> in 2006, police followed a radioactive trail across flooded. they found traces of polonium at a restaurant where he ate, also at the millenium hotel. it was here at the pine bark at the millenium hotel that alexander litvinenko drank tea with some russian visitors. that is the moment that the authorities believe that the poison was used. they follow the trail back to moscow. they have enough evidence to charge two men. one of them, this former security officer. they have both denied involvement and remain in russia. britain and russian leaders have been trying to patch up relations. aexander litvinenko's led to major diplomatic fight, and in quest might aggravate relationships further. >> any sort of definitive answer would be difficult to ascertain without russian government cooperation. >> the corner indicated that he would look at russia possible, but material on possible links between mr. litvinenko and british intelligence might not be released. >> for more on the political implications of the inquest, i spoke a short time ago with a member of the carnegie endowment for international peace. thank you for coming in. moscow hopes that this inquest will uncover the truth. >> i think the truth will be limited by the national interests of both sides. the russians are not forthcoming about any evidence that could be helpful to the u.k. government. we heard in the report that the u.k. will be covering up its purposes litvinenko was serving before his death. this is a mystery that has been failed in national interest from the beginning. >> the timing of his death, it was said that the crisis plunged the two nations into the worst relations since the end of the cold war. that is dramatic talk. this had a lasting impact. >> i think the relationship seems to have recovered. obviously, the interaction has been largely positive between david cameron and vladimir putin. some criticized david cameron for not being tougher on the litvinenko case. fundamentally, remember that this is the distinction between national interest and mr. putin's a personal vulnerability. if cameron is careful not to attack latimer putin directly come relations can cruise along. -- is chairman is careful not to attack putin directly, relations can cruise along. the sensitivity is particularly acute. the russian duma is poised to pass legislation that requires people to divest and move their investments outside of russia and that could include a lot of russian money that is currently in london. it undermines the basic bargain that mr. putin has had with people that support him in position of power which was make your money, do what you want with it, but support me politically. the british government kind of blunders into this whole affair now. they could strike at mr. putin's personal interests. >> i remember reading at the time that litvinenko died that london had more russian spies in it than at the time of the cold war. you can see it and hear it everywhere. does that account why there is so much as being not taking place? >> well, this is a two-way street. the russians are sending their agents over but the russian opposition, the russian oligarchs export themselves and their wealth to london. london has become one of several global hot spots in which the russian elite and the elite of many countries concentrate their wealth. >> with it comes the espionage. thank you. syrian opposition activists say that more than 30 people have been killed and dozens injured when there was an explosion at a petrol station. the syrian observatory for him and rights were told that the blast was caused by aerial bombardments. dodge the syrian observatory for human rights were told at the blast was caused -- this hearing observatory for human-rights were told that the blast was caused by airing bombardments. pakistani security forces used tear gas and live rounds to break up a crowd trying to reach the heavily guarded diplomatic zone in islamabad. protesters were protesting a film about muhammed. >> it did not look like there would be any way out with much more violence. it ended a very dramatically. hours a buildup and a standoff between police on the one hand and all of those protesters on the other with teargas being fired. suddenly, the religious leaders spoke to the crowd and told them to calm down and to disperse peacefully. it happened very quickly. this gives us an indication that to some extent these protests are being orchestrated and perhaps once as protesters realized, the leaders realized they had made their point, they called things off. this gives an indication of what could be to come. momentum is growing by these protests in pakistan. friday has been declared a public holiday by the government, a day of love for the profit, what that really translates to are many more demonstrations across the country. >> for more on the efforts to contain it, i'm joined by the former pakistani high commissioner of the u.k. who currently serves as the chair of islamic studies at american university. thank you so much for coming in. we had our discussion about pakistan. i want to show you what has been playing on pakistani television. the state department has put out a video distancing itself from the anti is on the phone. -- from the anti-islamic film. >> we reject all efforts to denigrate the religious beliefs of others. >> let me state very clearly, and i hope that it is obvious that the u.s. government had absolutely nothing to do with this video. >> hillary clinton and barack obama in that video. the state department, they spent $70,000 on this pr effort. this has the potential lead to reach 90 million pakistan is in the country. what do you make of this effort? >> i think that this is an important effort and we need to applaud it. >> could it be effective? >> i don't think it will change too much because we're in the middle of a whole movement. egypt, libya, india, mobs coming out. these societies alike pressure cookers. there is a lot of pressure within this society. a perceived attack on the pro phet is kind of like a catalyst. this touches very deeply into society. a gesture like the one made by the secretary of state, hillary clinton, is something very positive. but, we need to understand that unless the paradigm changes, we will have cause and effect and i don't condone any violence of any kind. we had 100 deaths since the crisis of the danish cartoons. we have had about 30 deaths since the film came out and the ambassador was killed. how many more deaths before we realize there is a direct connection between one thing and the other? when you set out to provoke people, it is no longer free speech. >> tell me what it is specifically about the prophet that muslims find so offensive. >> many people in the west would look to this and say that we lampooned everyone. why not your prophet? he is the foundation of the faith. on a cultural and social level, there is immense respect and affection for him. love on his birthday. ceremonies on the islamic calendar. there is a legal aspect which we forget. while here in the west, the constitution protects free speech. in countries like pakistan and saudi arabia, any attack on the prophet is blasphemy. >> do you expect these protests to continue? >> i feel very sad about this. you are seeing two civilizations failing to communicate. you are hearing about more films in the pipeline. they will be coming out and maybe it will spark violent protests again. we need to really discover a way of dealing with each other with respect and bridge-building rather than the cycle of violence. >> thank you for coming in to explain it all. these protests have revived questions about the american role in the middle east, it is an unusual departure for a presidential campaign focused on the economy. when foreign affairs are talked about by the candidate, it talks about china and the threat to american supremacy. we have traveled to all high to ask voters their what they think about the country's standing in the world. -- we have traveled to ohio to ask voters what they think about their country's standing in the world. >> this is mansfield, ohio. and employment is 9%. the community is struggling to recover from the closure of a car plant. the economy dominates. until towns like this see recovery, overseas activism will take a backseat. >> americans are conflicted. they have contradictory impulses in their foreign policies and always have. they shape the world in which they think is conducive to their interests. they have an impulse that says that that sounds like too much of a burden. >> the republican candidate came to man still last week. he accuses president obama of presiding over american decline at home and on the world stage. >> america does not have to have a long face we have right now and we can get america growing again. i know how to do it. >> there is an area of in this campaign, johnson and the economy to touch on foreign policy. that is trade practices and relations between the great talent. of the ticket, china. -- jobs and the economy to touch on foreign policy. a local republican candidate sees a direct connection between the ohio of economy and the wider world. >> we have to stand up to china and tell them that we want to be part of the international community and trade but they have to play by the rules. >> you can talk a good game, but i like to walk the walk not just talk the talk. >> president obama was also in ohio meeting voter to anxieties about china. he has imposed new tariffs on exports. mr. romney says he would go further than the president but he would be constrained by the realities of power. >> having a bad relationship right out of the gate with china is not a helpful way to try to protect our interests. we want peace with china on the world stage. so, i think that this is their first and most important issue that any president will face is after the redevelopment of the economy. >> there are plenty who'd to assume this country has passed the peak of their power and pride in america remains so strong that any candidate who told the public that would come under a hail of political fire. instead, america claims to the promise that economic recovery can restore a global order that today's citizens have known all of their lives. >> you are watching "bbc world is america," still to come -- a british soldier gives birth on the battlefield. -- you are watching "bbc world news america." the miners' that a platinum mine complex return to work. violent protests left 46 people dead. the miners are staging another strike, barricading a road leads to a platinum mine. >> fires and barricades outside of another mind. labor appears to be spreading. the illegal strikes at the big gold mine and here at the largest platinum producer in the world. the south african police who shot dead 34 workers at another mine last month moving in once again. >> we are not willing to work until we get this. >> the strikes followed an example set by the mine where six weeks of violence ended with a new wailed to deal -- and it with a new wage deal. >> i feel very happy that i can go back to work now. >> the impact of all of this on south africa could be significant. >> this requires review and in this respect, not just between capitalists, capital, and labor, but also within labor, the levels of inequality. i suspect that they will be more aggressive in the way they think about the distribution. >> the authorities are promising tough action to prevent the spread of illegal strikes becoming a full blown contagion. >> in china, the communist party is preparing to install a new generation of leaders who will run the country for the next decade. one of the most difficult challenges is what to do with one of the fastest aging populations in the world. the sheer number of old people is a huge economic strain. we began this special report in central china. >> his story is china's story. he has lived through hardship and famine. his parents died of starvation. he is now 79. life expectancy rivals the west. china has not yet built a comprehensive system of old age care. they fend for themselves from their children have all gone far away looking for work. >> i never thought what would happen when i am old. i guess i will die and no one would know. >> it is a lonely fate many here now face. in two decades there will be more retired people in china than the entire population of western europe. this is where the young come, to their factories. this fast cheap labor force has driven economic growth and it is drying up. as the number of elderly is rising, the birthrate has collapsed because of the one child policy. it will take six workers to pay for every pensioner today. soon, it will be just two. they will have to shoulder a greater part of the cost of paying for their parents. >> the bird is going to be heavy. our parents are going to get old. we will have to support them and pay for our child's education. >> china's economic rise has seemed unstoppable. that might be about to change. this looming population crisis, a shrinking work force, and a soaring number of elderly might be what ways the chinese growth down. china has prospered while its workers had been young. james young set up the biggest agency when he was just 30. it is now worth billions. an older work force will make china far less competitive. >> 20 or 30 years from now, china will enter a more developed stage. if we don't have enough entrepreneurs, if we don't have enough young people, we will have trouble competing. >> instead, this is what awaits china, a future visible now in a hospice in beijing. the illnesses of aging population. this man is 72. he has parkinson's disease. this man has battled cancer. he is leading the prayers. >> at night, we realized the guy in the next bed has died. there was one night when i was the only person of life in here. i'm used to it now. -- there was one night when i was the only person alive in here. >> making this nation yonder, not just richer, will be one of the biggest challenges facing the new leadership. >> from the sadness of the end of life to the joy and surprise of the beginning i did. a team of doctors was flown to afghanistan after a british servicewoman unexpectedly gave birth to a baby boy. the gunner and her son are said to be doing well. the soldier only learned she was about to give birth after having stomach pains. >> in a place more used to dealing with death than new life, it was here at the field hospital that the baby was born. the soldier was close to the end of her six month tour. she is in the royal artillery and had been in the mechanized brigade. a few days ago she complained of stomach pains. it was only then that she learned she was pregnant. on tuesday, the baby was born. the soldier had conceived her talk before being sent to afghanistan. shthe mother and child are in stable condition and receiving the best possible care. the statement says it is not military policy to allow service people to deploy it if they are pregnant. in this case, they were unaware of the pregnancy. this is the first time that a british soldier is known to have given birth on the front lines though more than 170 service members have been sent home after discovering they were pregnant. there are some women who did not realize they're pregnant until shortly before giving birth. >> it is far more common than we think it is. the figures had showed in wales, a rate of one in 2500 pregnancies. there was another study that gave a rate of one in 148 pregnancies. >> this case has fueled the debate over the more medical checks, for example routine pregnancy testing, is needed before women are deployed to the front line. >> the soldier in question was lucky that she was actually at the camp when she gave birth. there is a properly established medical facility which could look after her properly. if she had been sent out on patrol and was at a forward operating base, it might have been a very different story indeed. >> a special team of medics is now on the way to help care for the mother and baby now on the flight home. >> quite extraordinary. we wish both mother and baby all of the best. that brings the show to a close. thank you so much for watching. i will see you back here tomorrow. >> make sense of international news that bbc.com/news. >> funding of this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news america" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Sep 18, 2012 5:30pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." the tale of the tape. it romney gets grilled. nato announces it is scaling back missions with afghan security forces after number of deadly attacks. how much will really change underground's? and, rediscovering the music of -- now his songs are sounding the right and notes. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. 49 days to go until the election, tonight a secret videotape can of mitt romney is the talk of the campaign trail. romney is heard as dismissing 47% of americans as government dependent. who see themselves as victims. he said his comments were not an elegantly stated. what is the fallout? >> mitt romney does not need headlines like this 49 days before america votes. his latest problem is "mother jones" publishing a video of a dinner with trichet supporters. he suggests almost half of all americans are scrounge is. >> 47% who voted for the president are dependent and believe their victims who believe they are entitled to health care, food, and housing. you name it. they will vote for this president a matter what. >> he also says peace in the middle east is unthinkable because palestinians have no interest in it. within hours of the video becoming public, he called a hasty news conference. >> i am speaking off the cuff in response to a question. >> the obama campaign raced out a new advertisement. >> it shows he thinks that half of the country feels like victims. >> victims, i would not say so. >> the real problem is this is not a one-off. he spent the last days explaining away controversial remarks rather than punching home his big message. and his campaign seems to have descended into bickering panicked by the polls. in the race for the why house, barack obama and mitt romney were neck-and-neck but after the party conventions, the president called a head. -- pulled ahead. >> the campaign has been ragged around the edges. it needs to be sharpened. the candidates to be focused. he is no worse than two. behind. he is no worse than even with money. romney is strong the last to get better. >> mitt romney and the president agree the gulf between their visions -- the candidates is learning that dismissing voters on the other side of the divide is not good politics. >> how pivotal a row with its recording play in the presidential campaign? for answers we turn to a staff writer covering national politics for the atlantic. less than 50 days to go until the presidential election. how damaging is this to mitt romney? >> if it is it will be because it plays into the doubts a lot of voters already have about mitt romney. the ida he is out of touch and does not understand average people. you can hear the democrats amplifying that attack and pointing to these comments saying he looks down on americans who are making do with less or do not have as many opportunities. he is calling them miniatures saying they are lazy and shiftless and saying he does not want to be their president. he is only speaking to the people who share his philosophy. >> this is a very small number of voters. how do you think those remarks will go down? >> as an economic analysis, there a number of problems about what he was saying. as a political analysis, he is correct that the race is frozen in place and each candidate has about 47%. the question is whether comment's like this are really only speaking to his conservative base. even a lot of republicans do not agree with a sentiment like this. will it turn off the working class voters? >> what do stink hispanic voters will think of what he had to say? >> -- do you think hispanic voters will think of what he sad to say? >> the defense said have heard of these comments is that even those americans who receive benefits do not think of themselves as takers. it is always somebody else who is the lazy one benefiting from government. people do not look of themselves that way. >> it seems as though the campaign is turning on a self with staffers against one another. >> these are complaints that are starting to get louder. a lot of republicans outside of the campaign also starting to sound pessimistic. this is one of the sentence you often see when things are slipping away or going wrong. the pulse do not show that. they show a tight race. but there is a feeling among republicans, even with more than a month to go, that the whole thing could be getting away from them. >> now to afghanistan where the policy of the next president will have -- after weeks of attacks against nato troops by the afghan forces their training, some joint operations have been suspended. only large corporations will be conducted jointly. smaller ones will be evaluated. >> british and afghan soldiers on patrol facing the taliban. these missions will only happen with senior approval. a dramatic increase, killing foreign soldiers, it means the mission is keeping its partners at arm's length. >> obviously we take that seriously. to be honest, have we accelerated that in some cases? yes. have we stepped back? yes. we're not walking away. >> the british defense secretary denies this is a change in strategy. >> this is a draft we are looking at. we are looking at it now. >> international missions says it is not a draft. it will be effective from sunday. petitions forces seem to have been caught unaware. >> yesterday i asked about these deaths and he did not mention this at all. either he knew about it and was hiding or the americans are not bothering to tell their allies. >> the defense secretary was in front of parliament to clarify the policy in afghanistan. >> there has been no change of policy in afghanistan. as i told the house yesterday, the security of our forces in afghanistan remains a defense priority. the safety of our service personnel is an issue that all in government take extremely seriously. >> there has been a rise in the number of green and blue killings. afghans targeting nato troops. in 2007, two soldiers died as a result of these attacks. by 2011, the figure had jumped to 35. nato has lost 51 troops. seven of them british. it will partner with afghans on the biggest commissions. joint patrols have stopped. they will be approved with the permission of senior commandos. the strategy has been to train afghans to face the taliban. the closer they work together, the greater the risk to british and other soldiers. already soldiers are packing up and going home. international troops are stepping back earlier than expected. soon after an forces will be left to do most of the fighting. >> for moron the policy, i spoke with the u.s. ambassador to nato. >> if american troops cannot rely on afghan soldiers not to shoot them, has policy failed? >> this is a critical point where we need to protect soldiers and focus on the strategy looking forward. right now it has been a transition to afghan leadership. it requires the international forces to be working in lockstep. if we cannot count on that, you really have to ask yourself, is this strategy working? by setting a deadline and signaling to the taliban we will be living, -- leaving, that has been giving them certainty. i think the afghan security forces are patriotic in trying to defend their country. but the fact that the taliban is using these kind of attacks is having an impact. it calls into question what happens when we do withdraw. >> you think the deadline is involving the taliban. >> i think it has. they can see they know the international forces are going to be gone. can they intimidate the local forces in such a way they can have a return to power? >> there is no going back. >> it is difficult. we have to ask ourselves some questions now. we have been there for 11 years. it have we done nothing at all? and we return to a situation where the taliban returns to power? where do we care about the long- term outcome? what would be the implications for our own interests if we see it return to taliban rule tax >> there are 350,000 members. if nato troops will not control with them, how about ordinary afghans? >> that is the. the taliban is trying to make. is not safe to rely on the security forces. as international forces withdraw, only the taliban will be reckoned with. that is the challenge we have. if our goal is a stable afghanistan, we have to be prepared to make a longer commitment. >> thank you. in other news, striking miners in south africa are returning to work on thursday ending a six wheat dispute. the deal reached with the company is said to include a 22% pay increase. the strike cost to the mining sector more than half a billion dollars. anti-japanese protesters have taken to the streets of china over an escalating territorial dispute. four days of talk -- forced many japanese companies to suspend operations in china. around the disputed islands in the east china sea. they were said to have left the area by late evening. a french court has banned any further publication of photographs showing the duchess of cambridge sunbathing topless on holiday. the ruling says the publishers of the magazine must hand over all digital copies of the images within 24 hours. a spokesman for the royal couple said they welcomed the decision. our paris correspondent reports. >> the paradise under and the different kind of airport transfer. the duke and duchess of riven above the controversy. how could they not in the face of such a welcome? together they took part in a color file island dancing competition an occasion where every move a study closely. but this is the kind of occasion when they are happy to be on show. it is the private moments that are out of bounds. thousands of miles away, the media a master around the door where representatives from the office rendered the injunction. are you happy for their client, they asked? yes, it is a good result, she said. the magistrates banned the future publication of defending photographs. there will be a 10,000 euro fine for every preacher of the order. all the photographs are to be handed over to the two contentious within 24 hours with another 10,000 for each day of delay. this lawyer said it was the best possible outcome. >> the damage has been done. future damage will be limited by this decision. >> the duke and duchess welcome to the wording. it was a brutal exposure on the front page. but there is no mention in this judgment of the photographer although the newspapers speculate he or she may be british. how the photographer was employed, whether on a free- lance basis, would determine who owns the intellectual property rights. in spite of the judgment, the photographer could be free to sell the images abroad. caroling only refers to images published. the editor has already suggested there are more intimate pictures out there. all of these questions will be covered by the criminal case which the prosecutor opened today. he must determine who is accused and from which position the photographs were taken. there is a road that the lawyer said he would need a long telephoto lens to view the couple's about any. at least to the ruling will put down a marker. there is that a sense of wanting to protect his wife. there are obvious parallels with the treatment suffered by his late mother and he has made it clear he will resort to the courts if and when it is necessary. >> the latest on those photos of date. you are watching "bbc world news america." china -- china tries to put it scandal behind it. if you think of going on a cruise, you probably think about the mediterranean. how about belfast? >> the changing face of belfast. international cruise ships used to steer clear of the shores. not anymore. 4000 passengers and crew arrived and this family from the philippines could not wait to see belfast for the first time. >> we love the idea of going to european countries. belfast is one of them. we took advantage of that. can we go now? >> a record 43 chips have come this year. that is 43 more than 15 years ago. the violence used to stop visitors coming. the trouble has not stopped completely. but the city has been transformed by the peace process with a series of new attractions, including the titanic center. it has had half a million visitors. but what do the tourists make of this setting? >> everyone was friendly and kind and helpful. we had a lovely time. >> was it what you're expecting? >> better. it was much better than i expected. >> tourism is not just helping the image of belfast, it is a financial boost. these are difficult times for northern ireland's economy. international visitors is not going to solve those problems overnight, but could only help. these are the waters where the titanic was lost. belfast is no longer building ships but it is attracting them. mark simpson, bbc news. >> in china, the trial of a police chief accused of covering up the murder of a business -- british businessman has come to an end. officials said that he had not contested charges and might receive a lenient punishment. the wife of a senior politician has already been convicted of murdering mr. hayward. our correspondent has the latest. >> he was once a hero in china. the crime-fighting cop now a felony trial himself after he still this country's dirty secrets. he exposed murder, cover-up, and corruption by some of the most powerful. the court was ringed by police. the trial off-limits to a journalist. china's communist leaders embarrassed, want to close this can now. it began in the city where he was the chief hearing -- doing the dirty work for his communist party boss. in february he made a flight to the consulate, seeking refuge and dropped his bombshell. he told diplomats neil hayward had been murdered. by this woman, the wife of one of china's most powerful politicians. last month she was convicted of the killing. he had initially helped recover of her crime. now he is cooperating to escape a death sentence. the parts that have happened are the most sensitive. it tends to defect charges he recorded conversations among senior leaders. yes opened a window onto a closed world. he wants to resolve so they can go ahead with their leadership change due in a few weeks' time. outside of the courts, a protester was quickly dealt with. the party seems all sure what to do about the onetime contender now suspended. >> that to a singer whose music is enjoying a revival. known as rodriguez, he recorded two albums in the 1970's before leaving music to work on a detroit construction site. thousands of miles away, his songs gained a following among supporters of the anti-apartheid movement. one of those fans tracked him down in the u.s. and now his stories being told in a documentary called -- "searching for sugarman." ♪ >> i am a solid 70. i have done the 1980's, the 1990's. i was born and bred in detroit, michigan. my mother and father are mexicans. i describe myself -- i wanted to make something of myself. i left the music dream and i went back to work. >> if you walked into a random house solve that had a turntable, and a few flips of the records you know is c abbey road by the beatles, bridge over troubled water by simon and garfunkel, and rodriguez. it was one of the most famous records of all time. >> i went back to work doing demolition and construction. >> it was one of the biggest albums of the day. we did not know who this guy was. on all of the other rock stars, we have all the information we needed. on this guy, there was nothing. >> they told me about this fine days. -- fan base. they needed the lyrics to the songs. apparently they used to trade cassettes of my stuff. all right, then. it is a phenomenon. who would have thought? it is almost like winning the lottery. ♪ ♪ [applause] >> singer and songwriter rodriguez on how his music is connecting with a new generation. that brings today's showed to a close but remember you confined updates on our website. for all of us at world news america, thank you for watching and tune in tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding of this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry to operate in. working to nurture new ventures and provide capital for strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
PBS
Sep 7, 2012 4:00pm PDT
>> and now, bbc world news america. >> reporting from washington, i'm kathy. my time party, morning hangover. president obama rally supporters but is then hit with a disappointing jobs numbers. a young christian girl accused of blasphemy in pakistan is granted bail. she could soon be freed. but if she's safe? he really is treading on three eyes. the arctic is melting and the ripples could affect us all around the world. >> scientists are stunned by how much ice has melted this summer. the change so dramatic it could be affecting the global weather. >> welcome on our viewers in america and around the globe. the stadium had hardly been cleared after president obama's speech to the democratic convention when americans were hit with the reality of more disappointing jobs numbers. obama himself admitted that progress is not good enough but he added recovery will take time. last night, that is exactly what he asked voters for more of. our editor starts are coverage. >> he came on the chance on four more years and that is what it is all about, whether this man deserves to stay as president of the united states. he says he shares the pain and frustration of those who have lost their jobs but have never been more hopeful about america because of its people. this election would be the clearest choice in a generation. >> it will be a choice between two pads for america, between different visions for the future. >> this was not the rhetoric of four years ago. instead it workmanlike presence on the hard path to a better place. he derided his opponent as the same old failed policies of the past. >> have a surplus? try a tax cut. the deficit is too high? try another. stilicho coming on? take to bank tax cuts and rollbacks and regulations and call us in the morning. >> he mocked mitt romney's lack of foreign experience. >> you might not be ready if you cannot visit the olympics without insulting our closest allies. >> scarcely time to catch a breath and both hit the campaign trail. this is what greeted the president. >> we are not better off under president obama. fewer jobs, higher taxes on middle-class. fuel prices have doubled. >> with the romney campaign is focusing on eight states. the cost is nearly 3 million pounds. >> it has been 43 months above 8%. there are 23 million americans that are out of work or are underemployed. it is a national tragedy. >> this is the reality behind the rhetoric. today's disappointing figures show unemployment is not going up but few new jobs are being created. >> i do not think he has caused the problem but i do not think he helped a problem. >> i believe he is for the people and doing what he would do for his own family. >> they need somebody else in there. >> on main street, it would take a striking speech to outcry people's experience. both the political conventions are over and nobody had terrific triumphs. what matters is how it goes down and swing states like this one bank. one.is it looks like they're heading toward a photo finish. >> for more on the day after the convention, and the impact of those jobs figures that were published this morning, let's go to new york and speak to the managing editor of time magazine. economists had expected the economy to add 130,000 new jobs last month and it only added 96,000. what went wrong? >> the figures were disappointing and i think they reflect the headwinds from abroad, the slope and in europe and emerging markets, which is infecting industries like manufacturing. there had been a resurgence in ottawa jobs thanks to the bailout of detroit but now we're seeing a slowdn. >> even if these are caused by things that are happening abroad, that is not much help to the why house. >> no although it is interesting, i think this is going to be an unusual election. it has been already in the sense the economy has not been more of a headwinds for their president. any other era, you could not have an economy this bad and consumer confidence this low and still have an incumbent neck in neck with his rival. that is because the voters know they are more savvy about the economy. these problems are coming from abroad and they see the issue as the shrinking middle class and they do not see a romney as a guide beckon six that with his cayman island accounts. >> the one area where we might get relief is from the federal reserve. ben bernanke was prepared to do more to help the economy but getting back to your point about the era, that is a short term fix. >> absolutely. if you look at the history of quantitative easing, the first blast had an effect on the markets. the second one not so much. most do not think this will do much for the economy or the stock market because they have priced in the news. ben bernanke feels like he is the last man standing in washington and he has to do something. >> anything else is hijacked by the political realities of the campaign, right? >> while we really need to get jobs growing is a long-term reform. i think the president put that well in his speech. it is a long road but it goes to a better place. unfortunately have political gridlock. the bankers are trying to rescue us. i do not think they will be able to do it. >> there are two more jobs numbers. september and october. october will come out five days before people vote. do you think these numbers change people's mines or is this a question of perception? >> if you looked, you would say yes but it has been an unusual season. the president has been able to ride the economy well. i think of the numbers were down, that could have an effect but if they remain static, if unemployment continues to hover around 8.1%, he still could win. >> thank you as ever. a young girl and pakistan accused of blasphemy has been granted bail but her lawyers say freedom is not a guarantee of safety to was detained three weeks ago after she is accused of burning pages of the koran. ahead of her expected release, there are fears for her safety. people accused of blasphemy have been killed by extremists. >> her lawyers arrive for a crucial hearing in a case which has caused an international outcry. inside the courtroom, hours of legal argument about whether and mentally impaired young girl should remain behind bars. the judge has given his verdict and she has been granted bail. after three weeks, she can look forward to being the united with her family. there are concerns for her safety and for theirs. supporters fear they may be at risk anywhere in pakistan. the only grant -- a glimpse of her came nasty when she was remanded in custody. -- came last week when she was remanded in custody. >> no injustice will be done. the responsibility of her security is on the shoulder of the government. i give assurance that if she will be safe. >> in this neighborhood, her bell was not mentioned. the imam of this mosque has been arrested, accused of fabricating evidence against her. we ask locals if you would be welcome to come back. >> if she is innocent, she would be welcome. but we do not think she is innocent. among christians, there is relief that she will be out of prison but many feel vulnerable. >> it is possible that any of us could be accused of blasphemy. so we do not want to stay here. she is expected to be released from jail on saturday. but the blasphemy laws that put her here look likely to remain unchanged. >> a wering time for a young girl and pakistan. and look at some other news from around the world, prosecutors and france say the growth is survived an attack near a hot spot has confirmed her mother, father, and grandmother were among the victims. their older sister remains under police protection and hospital. a french a cyclist was also killed. rescue teams are struggling to reach villages in china where a series of earthquakes have killed more than 60 people and injured hundreds more. some 20,000 buildings have collapsed or been damaged. the united states says the pakistan-based haqqani group meets criteria as designated a terrorist organization. it has been accused of attacks in afghanistan like this one a year ago. it means the haqqani group could become subject to u.s. financial sanctions. the icecaps are melting in the polar north but the impact could be felt around the world. scientists say that dramatic changes are underway but could affect whether globally. the area has lost record amounts of ice and the melting is expected to accelerate. david is on the island to keep inside the arctic circle. >> i join you from the arctic island and behind me, and 800 miles to the north is the north pole and a few carry-on past that, you come to alaska, the ad states is one of many countries with a direct stake in what is happening in the arctic. let me show you the scene behind league. you expect that at this time of year, the peak of the melt season. there is snow on the mountainside in the distance. but what scientists are concerned about is the rate of melting out in the ocean. it has left them stunned. >> a journey through a frozen ocean transformed into slush. this is the arctic where temperatures are rising and the ice is stirring. we approached the ainge and we need to be careful. like many, it is shedding great chunks of ice into the ocean. 1 million fragments fall like trouble. -- rubble. it is beyond doubt the arctic is changing dramatically and the ocean is going through a record amount. although this region is remote, it could have repercussions for global weather patterns thousands of miles away. across the arctic, scientists are trying to understand what is happening. a helicopter lifts a device into the air and the measures the thickness of the ice. an indicator of how long it might last. the results are verified the old fashion way, by drawing. researchers say the ice is definitely getting thinner. during a break, i went on board to meet the scientist. these are cautious people but they are stunned by the scale of the amount. -- of the melt. >> i know this is unprecedented. it is truly amazing. it is a dramatic change. >> this is how much ice is left at the end of the summer. compare that to what is left right now and it is still under way. this landscape has warmed up in the past for natural reasons but scientists are convinced man- made pollution is accelerating the change and it is big enough to make a difference. >> when the arctic is ice free, when it is darker, we will absorb more sunlight. that change will influence when the system and precipitation. >> we find a bearded seal, one of many creatures that needs the eyes. the ocean will freeze but sometime soon there may be a summer with no ice at all. >> the impact of this change may be felt far beyond this remote part of the world. heat waves in the united states, storms in europe, all because the melting of ice may shift to the position of the jet streams. the scientists are convinced the scale of the change means they are onto something. >> david was some alarming findings from the arctic north that affects all of us around the world. you are watching "bbc world news america." team carrefour two enemies. a u.s. intelligence and cuban firepower are stopping drug traffickers before they can reach american waters. the united nations has doubled its humanitarian appeal for syria as the worsening conflict sense numbers of people fleeing the country. two bombs went off in damascus. state television said the first exploded in the north of the city. the second several hours later near the ministry of justice. our correspondent has sent us this report from london on. >> syrian television said the first bomb went off near a mosque in northern damascus. as worshipers were coming out after friday's prayers. buildings were damaged by the blast. state tv said they were hidden in a motorcycle. of those who died or security personnel. two hours later, a second bomb went off on the western outskirts of the capital. it caused the destruction to vehicles but the authorities said there were no casualties. the bomb exploded near the ministry of justice but does is not seem to have been badly damaged. the bombs in the capital came against the background of continuing violence around damascus and other parts of the country. it is one of several that have been pounded by artillery in recent days. this is where the fighting began two months ago and the regime does not have an under full control. the same goes for the country's biggest city in the north. it is still concern tested despite the use of artillery and firepower -- still contested despite the use of artillery and firepower. people are being killed every day. it has become a war of attrition. >> for more than 40 years, america has been fighting a war on drugs and the one thing yet learned is that it pays to have good allies. cuba is not an obvious candidate but the island has a zero tolerance policy and drugs and now have and is helping american officials to stop the flow of narcotics from south america. our correspondent has this report from havana. >> patrolling the coast of cuba. it looks tranquil this island is key territory in the fight against drug-trafficking. of the busy route, cuba has of its current. -- upped it guard. most boats are going for the united states. stuffed with up to a ton of narcotics. hear, a crew tries to dump the evidence. securing those drugs is a key concern for cuba and i was given access to see how the guards operate. the boats we went out on have been confiscated from traffickers. this was a training drill put the troops are under orders to keep genuine drugs off the shores. >> if they cannot catch the smugglers, they chased them out of these waters. cuba passes on real time data to the u.s. to pick up the pursuit. it is reared team work for two old enemies. >> the drugs have been found and secured. the priority is making sure that real drugs do not make it onto the domestic market but cuba is so close to america that this policy makes it into a major obstacle for traffickers. a heavily policed to society, it is no surprise -- low supply means that marijuana can cost up to zero because wage. but some still see potential. >> we have noted that he high price of drugs has stimulated attempts to bring narcotics into cuba. there has been an increase in these operations to. the amount is not huge but it is a concern. >> he tried that route. i met him in a prison where he is serving a 23 year sentence. he was trafficking from ecuador was stomachs full of cocaine. he says dozens more have joined him behind bars. >> everybody trying to do that is going to be caught. that is what i suppose. >> cuba's security forces are alert but for now they say most drugs were on routes to the u.s. and beyond. they end up in this factory. last year, over 9 tons of mechanics went up in flames. >> another problem on the high seas. it is not often we get to hear what it is like to be attacked by pirates. this week, a fuel tanker was hijacked close to the nigerian coast. the crew was freed and a reporter went to meet them. >> this is what the pirates were after, the star. the tanker was full of petrol and had just set cell. then at night, close to the nigerian coast, came under attack. the navy took us to meet some of the indian crew who had been on board during the hijacking. the captain said they came in four boats. >> they were very fast. the hat twin engines and the boats were big. each one had about five people. it was very fast. already one or two people -- they were on board. >> their crew had been trained for this and locked themselves in a safe room. the believe that the pirates spent the night offloading some of the cargo. one member climbed to get a mobile phone reception and called for help. it was all along, wait. >> it was very disturbing. let them take whatever they want to take. our lives should be safe. >> the navy sent a helicopter to rescue the tanker and two escort it back to the porch. this was the third hijacking in the region. the navy says increased patrols and preventing attacks but more warships are needed. >> while it might look like cigar -- like a success, there are a few worries. how did they manage to get the vessel in the first place and how did they get away? another question, as nigeria exports and refined oil, why was the tankard taking petrol from here to america? the rescue teams may have arrived after the pirates had fled but the crew were grateful for the help and relief to be free. what about getting in touch with your relatives? >> everybody asked us to get back as soon as possible. >> who did you call first? >> my wife and my mother. i have baby girls. it was a tough moment for me. >> a happy and luckey group. it is spreading to west africa as well. that brings today's show to a close. you can get updates at any time on our website. i am also on twitter. this is "bbc world news america ." have a great weekend. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. - get ready to blast off, neighbour. today we're going to play outer space at our friend miss elaina's house. and then we're going to play at prince wednesday's royal castle. i'm so happy you're my friend. ugga-mugga. be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood. ♪ - hi, neighbour. we're playing at miss elaina's house today. she lives in the museum-go-round, and she is a very fun friend. verrry fun. - (robot voice): daniel tiger, i'm so glad you came to play.
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Sep 3, 2012 5:30pm EDT
>> and now, bbc world news america. >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington. celebrations in south africa, the miners accused of murdering the colleagues released from jail following a dramatic u- turn. nearly impossible as how the new u.n. envoy to syria despite his job in a frank discussion of the bbc. flames continued to burn in california and will introduce you to the four-legged firefighters helping to supply the front lines. welcome to our viewers on pbs and america and around the globe. there has been more violence in south africa as tear-gas was fired outside a gold mine near johannesburg. it comes just weeks after police shot dead 34 striking miners. at the first -- the worst violence since the end of apartheid. they are detained and charged with murder. public pressure forced prosecutors into a u-turn in the first group of miners were released. >> inching their way to freedom, dozens of protesters arrived in the clothes they were arrested in a fortnight ago. there are charged with the murder of their colleagues but prosecutors dropped the charges, setting them free. as families away, it is clear it could be just a temporary reprieve. the judicial inquiry has four months to report back. then the moment when the men were released. more of their colleagues expected to go free later in the week. for now, a sense of triumphant. colleagues joined the celebrations on hand and a score them back to the alliance. this has been an embarrassing few days. but today, assurances that an inquiry would not be open to political influence. >> it will not interfere in the work. including the prosecution. >> they have been burying the dead. the union representatives joining politicians at the graveside. talks continue to end the wage dispute with reductions along the volga. karen allen, abc news, south africa. >> a suicide bomber slammed the car filled with explosives into a u.s. government vehicle. at least two people were killed in the northwestern city. to americans were among the injured. hillary clinton has condemned the bombing and urged the world to stand against such an act of violence. i spoke a brief time ago with the former u.s. state department spokesperson. >> successful attacks against american targets have been relatively rare. how significant is this development? >> we don't quite know who was responsible and what their target was. there have been attacked before. the trouble areas where many extra mr. elements are located. there have been significant security improvements in recent years. one possibility is a wanted to attack the consul itself at this was a fall back attack. >> of the u.s. put billions of dollars of aid in the pakistan every year. how do you think that this incident will play until that dynamic? >> there is a war going on between various extremist elements. this is a manifestation of that ongoing conflict. the united states has been attacking these elements steadily in recent years through the use of drums and the elements are trying to find ways to strike back. a big maybe the timing is interesting because in the aftermath of the raid, pakistan- u.s. relations hit rock bottom. they're starting to improve, so maybe it is trying to rekindle those tensions. >> his id emboldening militants and pakistan? >> there is a dynamic between afghanistan and pakistan. the united states as tried to get some of these elements to negotiate a peace settlement and they have been unwilling to do that. notwithstanding the united states strategy to appeal some of the elements of the violence strategy in the political process, this war continues. >> can you tell us about the location of today's attack? >> is a major pakistan the city. and what makes it a significant is the proximity to the largely under-governed tribal areas. that is where they are based, where the taliban escape to in the aftermath of u.s. and international intervention. it is the remaining safe haven where these elements are able to operate not only against afghanistan, but in pakistan itself. >> thank you for joining us. >> opposition activists claim at least 25 people have been killed in a government air strike. these unverified pictures seem to show a rescue operation in the immediate aftermath of the bombing. they have knowledge of the divisions among the world's major powers have hampered efforts to bring an end to the civil war. speaking to the chief international correspondents. >> is the toughest of jobs to try to make peace in syria. the first convoy tried for six months and quit, calling it a mission impossible. when i sat down with the successor, he was not much more optimistic. >> i know how difficult it is at a nearly impossible. i can say impossible. but nearly impossible. >> you said you were honored but also scared. what are you scared of? >> i am scared of the weight of the responsibility. people are already saying that people are dying. what are you doing to help? and we are not doing much. >> the veteran diplomat has been one of the most experienced troubleshooters. he took out assignments like iraq, haiti, and let the dog. he needs time to draw up his own plan. >> i don't have a plan yet. i don't want to pretend that i have things that do not work. i wish it were possible via bouncing to stop the fighting. it doesn't work that way. dodge the parting advice was that the president had to step down. coming under criticism from syria opposition groups. they're calling for fundamental change. >> change is unavoidable. governments accepted have otherwise they will have problems. about how to resolve deepening crisis, and the past, this a blunt mediator resigned when he did not get the support he needed. if he doesn't get it this time, he doesn't have a job. for now, his job is to talk to as many people as possible. he is also lowering expectations to what we can achieve. >> i spoke in new york just a short time ago. and you think he took on what he told you was a nearly impossible task? >> he did hesitate for a few days. he had qualms about taking on such a difficult assignment and he had been in constant touch with his very good friend. he knew very well the massive difficulties. he says he could not say no. when i asked for more details he said perhaps a bit of vanity and an extensive -- excessive sense of duty. a 70-year-old who's been going to syria felt that there might be little he can do, but he should do whatever little he can in a worsening in a deeply worrying situation on the ground. >> you have reported extensively. what role did you see for diplomacy of both sides are intent on battling it out? >> that is the question and there are many people in the region and outside that say the united nations is irrelevant. mediators give a fig leaf to both sides. some have described the existential battle and opposition forces are in a kill and be killed scenario. he was adamant that said that he refuses to believe syrians are like that. even the serious have multiple identities, they will put their identity first. he admitted he might be a bit naive but he is opening -- and hoping that some time they will pull back from the brain. he wants to be ready at that moment when they say we want to talk indirectly or directly and we need someone the help us to do it. >> has been a year-and-a-half since the bar was removed from power. a six-month investigation by the bbc has revealed the apparent collapse. the government is doing all it can to recover those financial assets but egypt will take a written report to retrieve more information. >> they wanted freedom that they also wanted their money back. reports of the millions of dollars that were stolen from egypt helped fuel the revolution. egyptians believed much of the money was concealed here in the city of london where arab elites have long gone to restore their wealth. britain promised to help egypt recover the assets but a year- and-a-half on, only 85 million pounds has been frozen in using easily accessible public documents, the bbc has found that the government apparently best. this 10 million pound house was the london home for many years of his son. but it has not been officially frozen. the authorities mr. the investment company belonging to a firm that he park currently owned. it continued to operate for 11 months after dissolving itself voluntarily. they missed a firm registered at this chesley address set up by another egyptian of the sanctions list. seven months after the freeze in order against her. one of the city's leading asset traces is astonished. >> you are on the sanctions list. what are you doing? this lady is here in chelsea. >> it is doing what it can, but it can't back on suspicion alone. >> we have a duty to the people the ostensibly of the money and those that are pursuing it. we have to make sure that proper legal processes have been gone through. we will trace assets and return assets. we have no vested interest in doing anything else. >> the official responsible for recovering the wealth says london request helped by asking for more information from egypt. information's egypt says it doesn't have. >> of the british government is obliged by law to help us but it doesn't want to make any effort at all to recover the money. it just says, and give us evidence. is that reasonable? how can we search for money in the uk? >> incompetence, lack of political will, or proper legal scruples? as far as egypt is concerned, london has simply broken a promise. >> still to come on tonight's program, on the eve of the democratic national convention, america's first black president changed the country. we will take a closer look. to friends and family -- is not every day you see a member of the royal family. prince andrew took on the challenge for charity. it took 30 minutes ago from the eighty seventh floor to the twentieth. he vowed, i will never do it again. >> high above the mitropoulos, virtually in the clouds, something extraordinary is happening. that is the queens side and he has stepped out of the eighty seventh floor of europe's tallest building. you want to know what it feels like? check out his helmet camera. his feet are sliding down the slippery glass walls and all of this, 300 meters above the pavement. it is all the duke of york's zone idea to raise money for the outward bound trust that encourages youngsters to take on new challenges and face their fears. today, he has been leading by example. he has been making excellent progress and for many of us, this would be terrifying. he seems to be taking his whole thing in stride. dr. back on the ground, relief. a promise fulfilled. >> this is not about me, it is about what we want to do for young people. we do it in a way that gives them a challenging environment that they can understand leadership and teamwork. >> the duke was among the 40 to take on the challenge and there are on target to raise more than 1 million pounds for outward bound. to causes that have moved here to do this. tomorrow the democratic national convention will officially gets underway in charlotte, north carolina. it is president obama a's turn to-his critics but whatever the outcome, the role as the nation's first black president will change and of the office and the country. the north american editor has more on the impact. >> and the paintings are about power, image is based on celebrations of generals and interests. there is a critical difference. the artistic fantasy of a black man in the place of kings and commanders have been trumped by reality. obama really does command a nation and army. >> it has been conceptualized in terms of race. there are children and out of the age of four or five who will have known only a black man as the seat of power. >> parents will tell you how important he is as a role model, stressing nothing is beyond their reach. but the economy is less inspiring. in atlanta, life has gotten tougher. a record of 36% living in poverty. but businesses are coming back. there is a swiss cafe and the heart of the area. people have to be patient. >> he focuses on middle america and programs to benefit the middle class. you have programs that trickle- down to the black community because we populate a large part of the middle class. >> far trickier is if obama has made the relationship between blacks and whites any easier. degeneration less haunted by the conflicts of the past. he bears the brunt of the attack. >> old suspicions diehard. many believe that politics have become so bitter and vitriolic in the united states precisely because president obama is black. from the joker to the lier, they often paint him as alien questioning his religion and birthplace. calling him the american. many people think that tells its own story. >> there is a difference of opinion and the difference of ideology on how the country should be run. how to improve the economy and have an opportunity for individuals. not racially motivated attacks, but getting to the core of the issue. >> rich with images of martin luther king and other icons, obama may join them as african- americans debate how much good he has done in power. >> we will have full coverage from the democratic national convention later this week. and controversy from the sports world. the columbia and the as blade runner has apologized for the timing of his complaint against the men that beat him in the 200 meter final. it revealed he won the race a fairly, but he says the length of some runners on blades gives them an unfair advantage. it will compete twice more before the games are over. one of the worst wildfires in recent memory. thousands of visitors to the national forest forced to evacuate. the cost of firefighting is plunging the state further into the red. despite the california reputation as the home of high tech, it is a front-line of the battle against the blazes. >> daybreak in the mountains of eastern california. she is one of more than 20 mules husband is national forest facility. these animals have long been used to back of firefighters as they go in the battle of the firefighters of california. >> we want to take hoyle and change for the immediate needs for the location they are at. it can travel throughout the world and they can travel on certain terrain. it can get right up to where the campsites are working. >> it is a cross between a donkey in the horse. more than 1,000 pounds of muscle bred for hard labor. >> it has the eyes of the speed of a horse, but the agility and smart mess of a donkey. >> when the call comes in, the equipment is packed and animals are loaded into a trailer. it means the jury can take several hours. they can deliver supplies to firefighters in the most remote areas. there are dozens of wildfires currently burning around california. it is an ongoing and expensive problem for a state struggling with the financial crisis. part of the economic solution for firefighters. >> de immediate need for suppression dictates they will go towards a mechanized equipment. you have a massive amount of forest fires to recognize the equipment. we will be able to do that. they haven't coniston -- come to grips with the fact that they are available. >> he proposes to focus of his job and the animals that make his unique lifestyle possible. >> you turn the mules in the corral and you see the good shape, and no worse for wear. that is one of the things that makes me happy. >> of the challenge is to make sure that their skills survived for generations to come. >> who ever dared to suggest they are stubborn, these are being exceptionally helpful. remember, you confide constant updates on our web site. to see what we are working on any time, visit our facebook page. from all of us here, thank you for watching and we will see you back tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
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